SOUTH CENTRAL REGION

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Sable a Swan rousant proper ducally gorged with Chain reflexed over the back Or on a Chief of the last a Roundel per chevron a Cross at the point Vert and Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours on a Mount a Beech Tree eradicated proper enfiled with a Saxon Crown Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Stag and on the sinister side a Swan rousant both proper.

Motto 'VESTIGIA NULLA RETRORSUM' - No backward step.
Granted 23rd March 1948.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

bucks cc arms

The swan was a badge of the ancient family of De Bohn, and of the Giffards who were Earls of Buckingham, and then of the Staffords, the first Dukes of Buckingham. The last two families owned the important castle at Buckingham. The background shows the Stafford livery colours of red and black. The roundel bears a representation of Whiteleaf Cross, a prehistoric feature of the County, and a conspicuous landmark. It has been conjectured that it celebrates some early Christian victory over Pagan forces.
The beech tree stands for the famous beech woods of the Chiltern Hills, perhaps the best known feature of the County. The Saxon crown about its trunk refers to the fact that the Saxons were the first settlers in the greater part of the County.
The buck is allusive to the name, and also refers to the park lands of North Buckinghamshire. The swan differs from the one in the arms in being free - that is, it has no collar and chain - and is thus an emblem of the River Thames. The supporters thus represent North and South Buckinghamshire.
The motto, appropriate to a progressive local authority, is that of the Buckinghamshire patriot, John Hampden, and of the Earl of Buckinghamshire.


HAMPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
Link to Hampshire CC Web Site

ARMS: Per fess Gules and Or in chief a Royal Crown proper and in base a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: Within a Saxon Crown a twin-towered Castle Or, Mantled Gules doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: Standing upon a grassy Compartment Vert semy of Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper on the dexter side a Lion rampant guardant Or gorged with a Collar and pendant therefrom by a chain a pair of Swords in saltire points uppermost Azure and on the sinister side a Stag also rampant guardant Or gorged with a Naval Crown pendant therefrom by a chain an Anchor proper.

Granted 18th June 1992.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

hants cc arms

The arms incorporate the rose and crown from the old county badge. According to tradition, the red rose was granted to the County by John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. Roses appear with other emblems in various arms of Hampshire authorities and the present arms of Southampton. It is worth noting that the use of the Royal Crown by anyone outside the Royal Family requires the permission of Her Majesty the Queen. Her Majesty graciously conferred this honour on Hampshire County Council by Royal Warrant.
The Saxon crown denotes the county's links with Wessex, the historic kingdom of which Winchester was capital. The castle represents Hampshire's important role through the centuries in the defence of the realm; a role reflected in the county's wealth of military heritage.
The golden lion derived from the Royal Arms represents Winchester's former status as the capital of England. This martial beast also signifies Hampshire's traditional connection with the Army; a connection further emphasised by the crossed swords hanging from the lion's collar. The stag represents the New Forest, the royal hunting ground created by William the Conqueror. The naval coronet and anchor around the stag's neck signify the county's historic association with the sea and the Royal Navy.
The compartment consists of a field of roses, representing the fine countryside of Hampshire.


ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY COUNCIL (UA)

ARMS: Azure a Castle triple towered Argent between Anchors Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Mural Crown Or charged with three Ancors Azure.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Horse and on the sinister side a Sea Horse both Argent.

Motto 'ALL THIS BEAUTY IS OF GOD'.
Granted 17th October 1938.

Picture taken from Heraldry of the World.

isle of wight cc arms

The castle is that of Carisbrooke, once capital and the historical seat of many former governors of the island. The blue field and anchors are representative of Wight's island status and maritime history.
The gold mural crown, is a familiar civic symbol, and typical of many English county arms. In the case of the Isle of Wight, three blue anchors have been added.
The horse and heraldic seahorse, represent respectively the agricultural and seafaring traditions known on the Isle. The white colour of these animals mirrors the use of a white horse on arms of Kent. This recalls the links with the ancient Kingdom, as both areas were settled predominantly by tribes of Jutes from the 5th century onwards.
The compartment features the sea and shoreline to further represent the island status.


OXFORDSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure two Bendlets wavy Argent between in chief a Garb Or and in base an Oak Tree fructed Or.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Gules a Grassy Mount proper thereon an Oxford Down Ram proper gorged with a Collar Azure charged with a Barrulet wavy fesswise Argent; Mantled Azure doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter an Ox guardant Gules gorged with a Collar Azure charged with a Barrulet wavy Argent and on the sinister a Horse Argent gorged with a like Collar on a Compartment comprising a Grassy Mound furrowed per pale and the lower edge excavated proper.

Granted 25th May 1976.

oxfordshire cc arms

The arms are based on those of the former County Council. The background colour of the shield is Oxford blue, representing Oxford Universty, and the silver wavy bands represent the River Thames and its main tributaries. The wheatsheaf and oak tree with acorns represent the agriculture and woods, which are the other outstanding features of the County.
The red mural crown is an appropriate heraldic emblem for county councils. The mound, in its natural green colour, represents the Mound of Oxford Castle. County government has been inextricably connected with the Castle site since the Castle itself was founded in 1071 by Robert d'Oilli in the reign of William the Conqueror. In the grant of arms, the inclusion of the Castle Mound, which dates from that time, is intended to symbolise this very close connection between the Castle and the County. County government has been transacted on this site for many centuries and it was the place of the ancient Shire Hall and now of the modern County Hall. The County acquired the freehold of the Castle site south of New Road in 1785 and so its historic nature and the County's interest in it can well be understood. The ram is of the famous local breed and symbolises the connection of the County with the wool trade for many hundreds of years. The former arms had such rams as supporters and like them this one wears a blue collar with a wavy silver band laid on it to represent the Oxfordshire rivers, as on the shield.
Following the reorganisation of local government in 1974, Oxfordshire was enlarged by the addition of the City of Oxford and an area of north Berkshire. The red ox is an taken from the arms of the City of Oxford, with its punning red ox crossing a ford. The former arms had an ox's head, with the same significance. The white horse adapted from the former arms of the Berkshire CC, as most of the area transferred from Berkshire is within the Vale of White Horse. Again their collars represent the Oxfordshire rivers. The supporters rest on a grassy mound which is broken by a central furrow and edged with earth, a further allusion to the importance of agriculture in Oxfordshire.


AYLESBURY VALE DISTRICT COUNCIL (BUCKINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Vert a Mute Swan rousant proper gorged with a Saxon Crown Or in chief a Bar wavy Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Vert a Cornucopia fesswise Or replenished with Fruit and Cereals perched thereon an Aylesbury Duck close proper.
SUPPORTERS On either side a Fallow Buck holding in the mouth a Sprig of six Beech Leaves proper and gorged with a Collar dancetty Vert.
BADGE: On an Oval per pale Gules and Sable environed of a Torse Argent and Vert an Aylesbury Duck close holding in the beak a Sprig of six Beech Leaves proper.

Motto 'CONCORDIA PRORSUM' - Forward in harmony.
Granted 1978?.

The Aylesbury Vale District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Aylesbury, the Borough of Buckingham, the Aylesbury Rural District, the Buckingham Rural District, the Wing Rural District and part of the Winslow Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

aylesbury vale dc arms
aylesbury vale badge
Badge

The green background indicates the fertility of the Vale. The main area is occupied by the traditional White Swan of Buckingham which is common to the arms of the County Council and the Borough of Aylesbury and the Borough of Buckingham. In the two former arms the swan has a gold ducal crown about the neck, with a gold chain attached, though in the Buckingham arms recorded at the Visitations the crown has no chain. In the Aylesbury arms it has no crown, like the County Council's Swan supporter. Here the swan's neck is encircled by the gold Saxon crown from the County crest seen also in red in the arms of Aylesbury. The white wave represents the River Ouse in its course across the District's northerly parts. The whole shield thus indicates this fertile rural area of Buckinghamshire watered mainly by the Ouse.
The colours of the wreath indicate the green of the Vale and the white of the Chiltern chalk. The gold cornucopia denotes the Vale's agriculture and associated industries, on which stands the characteristic Aylesbury Duck from the Aylesbury crest.
The two fallow bucks are like that which supports the arms of the County Council in allusion to the name. The collars in the form of a green 'W' are placed round their necks for difference and suggest the Rural Districts of Wing and Winslow. Each holds in the mouth a sprig of six beech leaves from the tree in the County crest, representing the union of six former Buckinghamshire areas in the District.
The idea of co-operation and progress is expressed in the motto. The word 'CONCORDIA' is part of the motto of the de Rothschild family, and 'PRORSUM' is part of the motto of Aylesbury, suggested by the idea of progress implied in the County motto.


BASINGSTOKE AND DEANE BOROUGH COUNCIL (HAMPSHIRE)

ARMS: Per chevron wavy Or and Argent a Chevronel wavy Azure between in chief two Beech Trees couped and in base a representation of St. Michael habited in Armour proper, a Skirt paly Gules and Argent hemmed Argent, and a Cloak Gules, nimbed and winged Or, brandishing in the dexter hand a Sword proper and standing upon and vulning with a Long Cross pommy Gules held in the sinister hand a Dragon on its back Vert.

Motto 'STEADFAST IN SERVICE'.
Granted ?.

The Borough of Basingstoke Deane was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Basingstoke, the Basingstoke Rural District and the Kingsclere and Whitchurch Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

basingstoke and deane bc arms

The shield forms a kind of heraldic map with the two former Rural Districts symbolised by two beech trees, a predominant feature of the natural scene, on a background of gold representing agriculture. The narrow blue wave suggests the Test, Bourne, Loddon and other local rivers watering the district. St. Michael and the dragon, is taken from the ancient seal of the former Borough of Basingstoke and has been used in the past in lieu of a coat of arms. This is depicted as in recent versions except that the staff in his left hand is topped with the distinctive St. Michael's Cross, with rounded ends, as it is in the ancient seal. This cross may be seen prominently displayed in St. Michael's Church, Basingstoke.
The motto is derived from the mottoes of Lord Porchester and the Earls of Carnarvon 'Ung Je Serviray' and Lord Portal 'Constanter'


CHERWELL DISTRICT COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Vert a Pale wavy Or thereon a Pale wavy Azure all between two Pallets Argent on each a Pallet Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert in front of a Rainbow proper an Oak Tree eradicated Sable leaved Vert and fructed Or, Mantled Vert and Azure lined Or and Argent.

Motto 'FROM CHERWELL FLOWS PROSPERITY'.
Granted 21st March 2016.

The Cherwell District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Banbury, the Bicester Urban District, the Banbury Rural District and the Ploughley Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

cherwell dc arms

The green background represents the countryside of North Oxfordshire and the gold edged wavy pale the River Cherwell. The pale flows north to south just as the River Cherwell flows through the area and gives the District its name. To either side of the River Cherwell are two blue lines that run the length of the Shield – one to represent the M40 motorway and the other to represent the Oxford Canal. Both of which also run throughout the length of the district and help emphasise both the district’s location in the centre of England and the benefits which a combination of location and communication have brought to the area.
The oak tree symbolises the Cherwell countryside and hearts of oak are an appropriate crest for a district which is at the heart of England. For Christians, indeed for all the Abrahamic faiths, the rainbow is a symbol of God’s covenant with mankind but over the years the rainbow has also equally come to be seen as a symbol of diversity and supporting inclusiveness and thus indicates that everyone whoever they are and from wherever they have come are respected and valued in Cherwell.


CHILTERN DISTRICT COUNCIL (BUCKINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Or on a Mount in base with Chalk Outcrops two Beech Trees in fess their interior leaves merging proper a Chief chequy Argent and Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules out of a Circlet per pale Gules and Sable charged with six Plates three being manifest a Mount Vert thereon a Wyvern wings expanded Gules and gorged with a Ducal Coronet Or.
BADGE: On a Bezant environed of a Torse Or and Gules a Mount thereon two Beech Trees as in the arms.

Motto 'FREELY WE SERVE'.
Granted 10th June 1975.

The Chiltern District was formed by the amalgamation of the Chesham Urban District and the Amersham Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

chiltern dc arms
chiltern badge
Badge

The two beech trees from the arms of the Chesham UDC, with their leaves mingled on a chalky hill, on a gold background, represent two united Chiltern authorities. The chequered pattern from the same arms, is an heraldic reference to the Chess Valley.
The red and gold of the wreath are in the heraldic liveries of the arms of the County Council. The circlet in red and black, is the basis of the County shield, derived from the liveries of the Earls and Dukes of Buckingham. This, like the red and black 'chief' in the arms of the Amersham RDC, bears three white roundels from the arms of the Penn family. The red wyvern of the Drake family, is also taken from the Amersham arms, the gold ducal coronet about its neck refers to the Dukes of Bedford.
The badge repeats the beech trees on the hill from the shield, set on a gold roundel surrounded by a red and gold wreath like that in the crest.
The motto was previously used by the Amersham RDC and is a quotation from 'Paradise Lost', in reference to Milton's residence in the district at Chalfont St. Giles.


EAST HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert on each of two Pales Argent a Palet wavy Azure all between five Beech Nuts in cross Or.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Or a Natterjack Toad salient Vert.
BADGE: Issuant from behind a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper sixteen Ploughshares gyronwise points outwards Gold.

Motto 'MENTE ET MANU' - By mind and hand.
Granted 1980?

The East Hampshire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Alton Urban District, the Petersfield Urban District, the Alton Rural District and the Petersfield Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

east hants dc arms
east hampshire badge
Badge

The green background represents the agriculture and rural nature of the District. The white 'pales' relate to the chalk downs and the two blue 'palets' represent the District's principal rivers - the Rother and Wey. The beech nuts refer to the woodlands and hangers, particularly as the beech is the predominant indigenous tree in the District. They are also intended to represent the literary associations of Jane Austen, Edward Thomas and Gilbert White, as the words 'beech' and 'book' have a common origin - the original European runic signs being marked on strips of beech bark.
The helm itself recalls the Civil War battle at Alton and to reflect the modern military presences of the Royal Air Force at Oakhanger, the Royal Navy at HMS Mercury, and the Army at Bordon. The mural crown is a usual feature of civic arms, and the natterjack toad was selected, as it is a very rare in Europe, the District being almost unique in containing one of its breeding grounds.
The badge combines ploughshares for agriculture and 'the Hampshire rose', the arrangement of the ploughshares suggests symbolically a rising sun, thus 'East Hampshire'.


EASTLEIGH BOROUGH COUNCIL (HAMPSHIRE)
Link to Eastleigh BC Web Site

ARMS: Azure a Fess Or thereon a Fess chequy Sable and Argent cotised Sable and charged with a winged Wheel Gules between in chief a Mitre proper between two Garbs Or and in base a Lymphad sails furled also Or.
CREST: Issuant from a Naval Crown Azure a Lion sejant also Or holding in the dexter claw two Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper and two Lily Flowers all conjoined on one stem proper, mantled Gules doubled Or.

Motto 'SALUS POPULI SUPREMA LEX' - The welfare of the people is the most important law.
Granted 23rd July 1976.

The Borough of Eastleigh was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Eastleigh and part of the Winchester Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

eastleigh bc arms

The Bishop's mitre refers to the connection of the Bishops of Winchester with Bishopstoke, and the two sheaves of corn, like those in that arms of the Winchester RDC, symbolise the rural and agricultural nature of the Borough. The two narrow black bands represent railway lines and recall the historical importance of railways in the old Borough. They also reflect the cablemaking activities of another of the town's large employers. The black and white chequered strip, as in the arms of the former Borough of Eastleigh, recalls that Eastleigh was once a Manor held by the Chamberlains of the Royal Exchequer. The winged wheel in the centre signifies the theme of progress and transport. The ship represents the shipbuilding and yachting activities at Bursledon and Hamble-le-Rice.
The intertwined lilies and roses at the top of the crest indicate the union of the two former parts of the Borough. The roses are Hampshire roses and the lilies represent St Mary, the patron Saint of the churches at Bishopstoke and South Stoneham. The lion is a traditional beast in coats of arms, and the naval crown records the Borough's naval connections.


FAREHAM BOROUGH COUNCIL (HAMPSHIRE)

ARMS: Sable on Water barry wavy in base proper a Lymphad Or the flags Argent charged with a Cross Gules on a Chief of the third a Pale between two Roses of the fourth barbed and seeded also proper charged with as many Keys in bend wards outwards the upper of the third the lower of the second and interlaced with a Sword in bend sinister also of the third pomel and hilt also of the second.

Motto 'PREST A FAIRE' - Ready to act.
Granted 15th July 1947 to the Fareham UDC.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

fareham bc arms

The black background refers to Fareham's association with industry, which formerly included ironworks. The golden ship represents the town's ancient prosperity as a port, a shipbuilding centre and as an anchorage for the Royal Navy before the days of ironclad ships. The keys and sword are derived from the arms of the See of Winchester, and recall that Fareham was in the past part of the endowment of the See and was formerly part that diocese. The keys and sword, being emblems of SS Peter and Paul, also refer to the dedication of the parish church. The rose is that of Hampshire and symbolises the County's former Lancastrian association and its grant by John of Gaunt.


MILTON KEYNES BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (BUCKINGHAMSHIRE)

*ARMS: Barry of seven Vair and Gules issuant from the base an Oak Tree of five branches fructed the trunk enfiled by a Mural Crown Or.
*CREST On a Wreath Argent and Gules the Battlements of a Tower proper perched thereon between two Branches of Oak fructed an Eagle displayed wings inverted and gorged with a Collar dancetty Gules.
*SUPPORTERS On either side a Fallow Buck each charged on the shoulder with a Double Axe proper.

Motto 'BY KNOWLEDGE DESIGN AND UNDERSTANDING'.
Granted ?.

The Borough of Milton Keynes was formed by the amalgamation of the Bletchley Urban District, the Newport Pagnell Urban District, the Wolverton Urban District, the Newport Pagnell Rural District and part of the Wing Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

milton keyes bc arms

The alternate white and blue bars and red bars are from the arms of the Keynes family, and symbolize the historical background of Milton Keynes. The oak tree with five branches symbolizes the steady growth of the new single authority from the five constituent ones, and is ringed by a mural crown, a common symbol of local government.
The battlement of a tower are from the crest of Newport Pagnell UDC, where they refered to the ancient castle of the Paganels, they can also be seen as refering to the other Norman castles of the area (Castlethorpe, Lavendon, Wolverton and Old Bradwell). The eagle was common to the arms of the Bletchley UDC and the Newport Pagnell RDC, and refers to the area's many Roman associations - Watling Street and the military camp of Magiovintum, to the south-east of Fenny Stratford.
The bucks are a reminder of the dexter supporter of the arms of the County Council, each is charged on the shoulder with a symbol unique in civic heraldry - the Double Axe (a prominent symbol of authority in ancient Crete, being found carved on the walls of Minoan cities, the earliest known form of planned community). The axe also refers to the location within the Borough of the new city of Milton Keynes, whose Development Corporation uses a graphic derived from the axe.
The motto not only refers to the location in the Borough of two of the nation's most modern concepts, the Open University and the new city, but also names the qualities required in a forward-looking authority.


NEW FOREST DISTRICT COUNCIL (HAMPSHIRE)
Link to New Forset DC Web Site

ARMS: Vert a stag's head caboshed between the attires an arrow point downward surmounted by a stirrup all Or on a chief wavy argent an ancient ship sail furled issuing proper.
CREST: On a wreath of the colours, in front of an oak tree fructed proper a sea-lion sejant azure resting the dexter foot upon an anchor erect Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a New Forest pony proper and on the sinister side a boar argent armed crined and unguled Or each charged on the shoulder with a spring of broom palewise flowered proper.
BADGE: On an oval vert a stag's head caboshed between the attires an ancient ship as in the arms all Or.

Motto 'OLD YET EVER NEW'.
Granted 22nd September 1976.

The New Forest District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Lymington, the New Forest Rural District and part of the Ringwood and Fordingbridge Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

new forest dc arms
new forest badge
Badge

The green background, stag's head, arrow and verderer's stirrup-iron are all from the arms of the New Forest RDC. The wavy edge of the 'chief' is like that in the arms of the Ringwood and Fordingbridge RDC and the ancient ship is from the seal and arms of the Borough of Lymington. The shield thus represents the union of Forest and maritime areas.
The oak tree shown here in its natural colours is from the arms of Ringwood and Fordingbridge RDC and the blue sea-lion is from the Lymington crest - derived from the Redvers lion with a fish tail, but without the wings, which it had in the original crest. The gold anchor suggests the activitites of the Port of Lymington.
The New Forest pony is derived from the pony's head in the crest of Ringwood and Fordingbridge. The white boar is that of the Courtenays, anciently Lords of the Manor, which also supports the Lymington arms. The sprigs of broom are a reminder of the extensive heathlands of the forest area.
The motto is that of the former New Forest RDC.


OXFORD CITY COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Argent an Ox Gules armed and unguled Or passing over a Ford of Water in base barry wavy Azure and Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Lion rampant guardant Azure crowned with an Imperial Crown proper holding between the paws a Rose Gules charged with another Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side an Elephant Ermines eared Argent tusked Or collared and lined Or and on the sinister side a Beaver Vert its tail barry wavy [= scaly] Azure and Argent ducally gorged and lined Or.

Motto 'FORTIS EST VERITS' - Strong is truth.
Arms, crest and supporters recorded at the Visitation on 12 August 1634. The crest differs from that granted with the supporters in 1574.

oxford city arms
oxford city arms

The device on the shield, which appeared on a 14th century seal, recalls the suggestion that a ford for oxen crossing the River Thames was the origin of this famous city. An alternative theory is that the syllable "ox" is a variant of an old Celtic word meaning "water".
The crest is composed of royal emblems.
The significance of the supporters is unknown. The beaver probably refers to the River Thames, but also appears in the arms of a family associated with the City's history, as does the elephant.
The shield is sometimes shown encircled with a blue ribbon charged with four golden roses and four golden fleurs-de-lis set alternately. The lion in the crest is sometimes shown gold and scattered with blue fleurs-de-lis.


PORTSMOUTH CITY COUNCIL (UA) (HAMPSHIRE)

ARMS: Azure a Crescent ensigned by an Estoile of eight points Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours on a Mural Crown proper a Sea Lion sejant guardant Or murally crowned and tailed proper the dorsal and caudal fins Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Sea Lion guardant Or murally crowned and tailed all proper the dorsal and caudal fins Or on the sinister side a Sea Unicorn Argent armed crined and unguled Or the tail proper the dorsal and caudal fins Or gorged with a Naval Crown Or affixed thereto by a Ring and reflexed over the back a representation of 'The Mighty Chain of Iron' which defended Portsmouth Haven in the sixteenth century Sable each supporting between the forelegs a Staff proper flying therefrom a Banner of the Arms fringed Or.
BADGE An Anchor and a Sword the quillons Or and hilt Gules in saltire surmounted by a Hurt charged with a Crescent ensigned by an Estoile of eight points Or.

Motto 'HEAVEN'S LIGHT OUR GUIDE'.
Arms recorded at the Visitation of 1686. Crest, Supporters and Badge granted 1970.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

portsmouth city arms
portsmouth badge
Badge

The golden star and crescent on a blue backgound have been the City's arms for 800 years. There are various theories about their origin but it is likely that the device was copied from the arms of William de Longchamp, Lord Chancellor to Richard I at the time of the granting of the Town's first definite Charter on 2nd May 1194.
The sea lion and sea unicorn are a maritime version of the Royal Crest and Supporters. A rare privilege, reflecting Portsmouth's long association with the Crown. The unicorn wears a naval crown and a mighty chain of iron, which is a pictorial representation of the chain boom, which, from Tudor times, stretched from the Bound Tower, Old Portsmouth, to Fort Blockhouse, Gosport, as a protection to Portsmouth Harbour. The mural crowns are civic emblems and also refer to the land defences which surrounded Portsmouth from Elizabethan times to 1862.
The motto was registered in 1929, it is that of the Order of the Star of India and of the old indian troop ships which embarked their passengers at Portsmouth.


READING BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (BERKSHIRE)

ARMS: Azure five Maidens' Heads in saltire couped at the shoulders and vested proper each crined and wearing a Necklace and Pendant Or the centre head imperially crowned Gold the Cap Gules in fess the Letters RE also Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure issuant from a Circlet of four [inverted] Escallops and as many Lyres alternating Or a Mitre proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Ram Argent armed and unguled Or charged on the shoulder the dexter with a Portcullis chained Azure the sinister with a Hurt thereon a Plate charged with two Bars wavy also Azure.

Motto 'A DEO ET REGINA' - From God and the Queen.
Arms recorded at Visitations of 1566, 1623 and 1665. Certified 22nd September 1893, with considerable differences in details. Crest and supporters granted 20 May 1953, to the Reading County Borough Council.

The Borough of Reading ia coterminious with the former County Borough of Reading.

Picture courtesy of Laurence Jones.

reading bc arms

Until the new grant in 1953, the arms of the Borough of Reading consisted merely of the blue shield on which are the five maidens' heads. These were granted in 1566, and was definitely based on the common seal of the town which was in use as early as 1365, the date of the earliest example still surviving, and was probably of much earlier date. In this seal, still in use today, the heads are those of men, the middle one wearing a Saxon crown. It has been suggested that the central head represented Edward, King of the English (975-8), assassinated at the instigation of his stepmother, Queen Elfrida, in order that her own son should occupy the throne. In expiation of her crime, Elfrida founded a nunnery at Readirg on the site of St Mary's Church. The letters "R E" are found on the arms of the 1566 Grant but omitted in the one of 1623 and subsequently, until restored in 1953. The exact meaning of the letters "R E" in the 1566 grant is not known. Some authorities consider that they stood for the two first letters of the name of the town. As their first known use was in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, some consider that they stood for "Regina Elizabetha". Their reintroduction in the present arms may also be regarded as a tribute to Queen Elizabeth II, in whose coronation year these new arms were granted.
The Abbot's mitre commemorates the once magnificent Reading Abbey. The escallop shells, once used as badges by pilgrims, represent the pilgrims or palmers who came there from all parts and the lyres are symbolic of the Abbey's musical fame.
The two rams represent the early wool trade of Reading. The portcullis represents the Borough and the two blue waves on the silver roundel symbolise the rivers Thames and Kennet, which flow through Reading.


RUSHMOOR BOROUGH COUNCIL (HAMPSHIRE)

ARMS: Tierced in pairle reversed Gules Azure and Or in the first two Swords in saltire points upward Argent hilts Or in the second a Key ward downward enfiled of an Astral Crown Or in the third a Rose Gules charged with another Argent both barbed and seeded proper.
CREST On a Wreath Or and Gules two Fern Leaves in saltire proper between two Roses Or barbed and seeded proper.
SUPPORTERS: To the dexter a Lion rampant guardant Gules gorged with a Mural Coronet pendent therefrom a Mullet Or to the sinister a winged Lion rampant Gules gorged with an Astral Crown pendent therefrom a Latin Cross Or.

Motto 'STRENGTH IN UNITY'
Granted 7th August 1975

The Borough of Rushmoor was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Aldershot and the Farnborough Urban District.

rushmoor bc arms

The crossed swords depict the Borough's close association with the Army and the key encircled by an astral crown signifies the connection with the Royal Aircraft Establishment. The rose is the Hampshire Rose, the emblem of the County.
The fern leaves and roses are similar to those in the crest of the Farnborough UDC, where they referred to the derivation of the placename.
The lions are similar to the supporters of the arms of the Borough of Aldershot, although the right hand lion now has wings to denote the Borough's association with aviation. The Latin cross is from the crest of Farnborough and the mullet from the crest of Aldershot.


SLOUGH BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (BERKSHIRE)

ARMS: Per chevron Or and Gules on Waves barry wavy Argent and Azure a Swan proper holding in the beak a White Pink slipped and leaved proper the whole between four Chevronels interlaced Sable on a Chief Azure within an Anulet Or a Mullet Argent between fourteen like Mullets.
CREST: Rising from a Mural Coronet proper a Mount Vert theron in front of an Oak Tree proper fructed Or a Stag at gaze between two Brick-Axes all Gold.

Motto 'SERVE WITH HONOUR'.
Granted ?.

slough bc arms

The swan, like that in the arms of the former Borough of Slough, is indicative of Buckinghamshire, Slough's former county. It is here shown swimming on stylised water and holds in its beak a flower known as a pink (but in this instance coloured white), which has both stalk and leaves representing the horticultural interests of the Borough. The four thin interlaced chevrons allude to modern technology with particular reference to the manufacture of alloys. The blue chief represents the night sky, the silver star surrounded by a gold ring relates to the discovery of the Planet Uranus by Sir William Herschel. On either side are placed fourteen similar stars, arranged seven and seven.
The mural crown symbolises municipal government coloured in its natural colours as if a city wall. The oak tree and stag indicate Berkshire, on either side are placed a brick-axe coloured gold emblematic of the former brickmaking industry in the Borough.


SOUTH BUCKINGHAMSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Sable issuant from a plain Base barry wavy of four Argent and Vert a Mount of the last thereon in front of a Beech Tree fourche of two branches Or a White Swan wings inverted and addorsed proper gorged with a Saxon Crown Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent Gules and Sable within a Circlet of four Fleurs-de-Lys three being manifest Gules a Panther issuant guardant Argent semy of Hurts gorged Gules holding between the forepaws a Petasus Gold.
SUPPORTERS: Two Fallow Bucks guardant proper between the antlers of each a Cross formy fitchy Or.

Motto 'CONSILLO ET ANIMIS' - By wisdom and courage.
Granted 17th December 1985.

The South Buckinghamshire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Beaconsfield Urban District and part of the Eton Rural District.

Picture by R.Young, Stoke Poges 2001.

south buckinghamshire dc arms

The arms are based on those of the former Eton RDC, these indicated the District's situation in Buckinghamshire, mainly in the south near the Thames, and the symbolism is continued in the background of the historic livery colours of the Staffords, Earls and Dukes of Buckingham, whose red and black livery forms the basis of the arms of the County Council. Their White Swan badge, also familiar in the County, stands on a grassy bank by the heraldic river and wears round the neck the Saxon crown from the County crest. Completing the symbolism is an heraldically stylized tree derived from the familiar Buckinghamshire beech in the County crest, the trunk forked to denote the union of two former county districts. The arms therefore identify the South Buckinghamshire District as an amalgamation of most of the former Eton Rural District and the Beaconsfield Urban District.
The crest, is also based largely on that of Eton RDC and composed of emblems denoting several notable families having historical links with the District. The circle of red fleurs-de-lys (Astor, of Cliveden), the white panther spotted with blue (Palmer, of Dorney) wearing a red collar (Desborough, of Taplow)and holding a gold winged helmet (Burnham, of Beaconsfield).
The fallow bucks are an obvious play on the name, as is that in the arms of the County Council, from which they are differenced by showing the heads full-faced. This posture links them with the arms of the Duke of Portland, in which full-faced bucks' heads are included. Between the antlers of each bucks rises the gold cross from the arms of the Bulstrodes of Gerrards Cross as it does between the antlers of a stag's head in the Bulstrode arms. The motto is that of the former Eton RDC.


SOUTH OXFORDSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.
BADGE: No information currently available.

Motto 'ET PATRIBUS ET POSTERITATI' - For our ancestors and posterity.
Granted 1981?.

The South Oxfordshire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Henley-on-Thames, the Borough of Wallingford, the Thame Urban District, the Bullington Rural District, the Henley Rural District and the Wallingford Rural District.

south oxfordshire dc arms
thame town badge
Badge of Thame Town Council

The interlaced gold lines, like those in the arms of Didcot TC, represent that town's connection with the railways. The sunburst, seen in the Henley TC arms and the former Borough of Henley's seal is a badge of Edward III. The portcullis is from the arms of the Wallingford TC and the two wheatsheaves are from the Thame town badge.
The mural crown is symbolic of municipal authority and also signifies the ancient Roman walled town at Dorchester. The golden dragon is that of the Kingdom of Wessex and combined with the mitre, recalls the King of Wessex, who was baptized into Christianity at Dorchester and for the diocese once based there.
The ox is derived from the arms of the Oxfordshire CC and the lion represents England. Both are 'gorged' with a blue crown symbolising the links with the Sovereign extending from the Royal Castle at Wallingford to the Royal Flight of the RAF at Benson. The beech branches refer to the Chiltern villages and the compartment upon which the supporters stand suggest the Oxfordshire plain. The Thames is represented by symbolic water, traversed by a stone bridge.


TEST VALLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL (HAMPSHIRE)
Link to Test Valley BC Web Site

ARMS: Vert a Pale cotised all wavy Argent over all a Trout leaping to the dexter proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours out of a Mural Crown Gules a Mount Vert thereon between two Stalks of Wheat leaved and issuant in front of a Crosier erect the head to the sinister Or a Lion statant guardant Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Hart Royal Or gorged with a Riband Vert pendent therefrom by a ring Argent a circular Torse Argent and Vert enclosing an Oak Tree throughout and on the sinister side a Hart Royal proper gorged with a like Riband pendent therefrom by a like ring a circular Torse Or and Gules enclosing a Portcullis throughout chained Or.
BADGE: A Trout leaping to the dexter proper enfiling a Mural Crown as in the Crest.

Motto 'DEO TESTE VALEAMUS' - With God as our witness, let us be strong.
Granted 15th May 1977.

The Borough of Test Valley was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Andover, the Borough of Romsey, the Andover Rural District and the Romsey and Stockbridge Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

test valley bc arms
test valley badge
Badge

The broad white wave and the two narrow ones represent the River Test and its tributaries, together with the brown trout, they symbolise the name and character of the Test Valley.
The mural crown from the crest of the Borough of Romsey, is a common civic emblem and the red lion upon a grassy hill is from the arms of the Borough of Andover. The crosier from the arms of Romsey, refers to Romsey Abbey and in the wider context, to other monastic foundations in the area. The two stalks of wheat represent the two former Rural Districts.
The golden 'hart royal' (a stag with twelve points) is from the Andover crest and the 'torse' of green and white, is in the Andover colours. The oak tree from the Andover shield is also appropriate to the Andover Rural District. The other hart is from the Romsey arms, its 'torse' of red and gold is in the Romsey colours. The gold portcullis is from the ancient seal and the arms Romsey. This was also used by the Romsey and Stockbridge RDC.


VALE OF WHITE HORSE DISTRICT COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Argent two Bars wavy on a Chief wavy Vert a representation of the White Horse of Uffington facing to the sinister proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours an Ancient Crown Or between two Lightning Flashes Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a mitred Abbot proper holding a Book Gules and on the sinister side a Saxon King proper crowned Or habited Argent and cloaked Azure girt with a Sword in its Scabbard Gules the hilt and pommel Or and holding in the Sinister hand a Scroll Argent.

Motto 'SUB EQUO AEQUITAS' - Under the horse there is equity.
Granted ?.

The Vale of White Horse District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Abingdon, the Wantage Urban District, the Abingdon Rural District, the Faringdon Rural District and part of the Wantage Rural District.

vale of white horse dc arms
white horse from air
White Horse of Uffington from the air

The main feature of the shield is naturally the White Horse of Uffington, that is carved into the chalk hillside, and was formerly used as a badge by the Faringdon RDC. The wavy bars represent the rivers of the Vale.
The ancient crown symbolises the associations of Anglo-Saxon royalty with the District and the lightning flashes, like those in the crest of Abingdon TC, represent the atomic research establishment.
The mitred Abbot in commemorates Abingdon Abbey, and he holds a book to illustrate the importance of Abingdon as a seat of learning through the centuries. The other supporter is intended to be King Alfred the Great, who was born in Wantage in the year 849 and he holds a scroll in honour of his fame as a law giver.


WEST BERKSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL (UA)

*ARMS: Per pale Or and Gules two Bendlets interlaced with two Bendlets sinister between in chief and in base a Cog-Wheel surmounted by a Garb all counter-changed.
*CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules on a Mount Vert a Mural Crown Or thereon a Cavalier holding a Sword erect and upon a Horse forcené proper.

Motto 'FORWARD TOGETHER'.
Granted ?, to the Newbury District Council.

The Newbury District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Newbury, the Bradfield Rural District, the Hungerford Rural District, the Newbury Rural District and part of the Wantage Rural District. On 1st April 1998, Berkshire County Council was abolished and Newbury District Council changed its name to West Berkshire Council and took on the former County Council's responsibilities, when it became a Unitary Authority.

west berkshire bc arms

The gold and red background represents the industrial and historic richness of the area. The interwoven diagonal cross represents the weaving industry, important to Newbury in the fifteenth and sixteenth century, which helped to establish the town as a manufacturing centre.The sheaves of corn, like those in the arms of the former Borough of Newbury, symbolise the importance of agriculture to the area for the past 2000 years. The cogwheels which the sheaves are placed on signify the engineering works and scientific improvements that provided employment to many, as they do to this day.
The cavalier refers to the Battles of Newbury in 1643 and 1644 during the Civil War. The mural crown and grassy mount represent local government and chalk downlands that make up so much of the District.


WINCHESTER CITY COUNCIL (HAMPSHIRE)

ARMS: Gules five Castles triple towered in saltire Argent masoned proper the Portcullis of each part-raised Or and on either side of the castle in fess point a Lion passant guardant that to the dexter contourné Gold.
BADGE: Upon a Mount Vert a Castle triple towered Argent masoned proper in the portal a Portcullis part-raised Or and on the towers a Lion passant guardant Gold.

Arms recorded at the Visitation of 1686, transferred and badge granted 1985.

The City of Winchester was formed by the amalgamation of the former City of Winchester, the Droxford Rural District and part of the Winchester Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

winchester city arms
winchester badge
Badge

The earliest example of the arms is in a late 15th-century window in the Westgate. The castles and Royal Lions or "Lions of England" suggest a derivation from the Common Seal of 1253, consisting only of a single triple-towered castle, and the Statute Merchant Seal of 1283, comprising the bust of Edward I between two castles and a single Royal Lion. Winchester, the ancient capital of England, continues therefore to use its arms in the original form and has never sought to add a crest, a motto or supporters, which emblems were not in use for towns at the time when Winchester's arms originated.


WINDSOR AND MAIDENHEAD ROYAL BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (BERKSHIRE)

*ARMS: Per pale dovetailed the dexter per fess Argent and Vert a Stag's Head caboshed of the first in chief between the attires an Escutcheon of France Modern and England quarterly the sinister Azure three Pallets wavy Argent issuant from a Bridge of as many arches in fess proper.
*CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules between two Branches of Oak leaved proper and fructed Or a Mount Vert thereon a Castle Wall with three Towers Argent surmounted by a Lion's Face Or.
*SUPPORTERS: Dexter a Horse Argent gorged with an Ancient Crown Or and charged on the shoulder with a Sprig of Oak leaved proper and fructed Or sinister a Swan roussant Argent gorged with an Ancient Crown Or and charged on the wing with a Sprig of Oak leaved proper and fructed Or.

Motto 'IN UNITATE FELICITAS' - In unity happiness.
Granted 1977?.

The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Maidenhead, the Royal Borough of New Windsor, the Eton Urban District, the Cookham Rural District, part of the Eton Rural District and the Windsor Rural District.

windsor and matdenhead royal bc arms

The shield combines the principal elements of the arms of the former Royal Borough of New Windsor and the former Borough of Maidenhead. White and green are the livery colours of the Tudor dynasty and the stag's head is for Windsor Great Forest. Between the stag's antlers are the Royal arms as used between 1405 and 1603. The sinister side depicts Maidenhead's bridge over the River Thames. These are joined by a dovetailed dividing line, which signifies the inseparable union of the two formerly independent councils - with a bond of the strongest kind.
The castle on a grassy hillock symbolises Windsor Castle's raised location in the town. The oak sprigs, like those in the arms of the Windsor RDC, and lion's face represent the forests of Windsor and the Royal Heraldic lions.
The white horse relates to the supporters of the arms of Berkshire CC and the swan from the arms of the Buckinghamshire CC, as the areas of Eton, Eton Wick, Datchet, Horton and Wraysbury were formerely in that neighbouring county.


WOKINGHAM BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (BERKSHIRE)

ARMS: Argent two Bars wavy Vert over all a Stag's Head caboshed proper on a Chief Gules in front of two Pastoral Staves in saltire Or a Mitre the infulae entwined with the staves Argent.
CREST: Out of a Coronet composed of four Ears of Wheat and as many Acorns leaved set alternately upon a Rim Or a Mount Vert thereon a Lion passant guardant Gold supporting with the dexter forepaw an Oar erect proper; Mantled Vert doubled Argent.

Motto 'UNUM E PLURIBUS' - One made out of many.
Granted 12th March 1962, to the Wokingham Rural District Council.

The Borough of Wokingham was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Wokingham and the Wokingham Rural District.

wokingham bc arms

The three white waves and two green ones, each resembling an initial W, suggest the undulating farmlands and rich woodlands enclosed by the Thames, Loddon and Blackwater rivers. The royal stag's head, similar to that in the arms of Windsor and that of the complete stag in the arms of the Berkshire CC and the former Borough of Wokingham , refers to the situation of large parts of the borough in the ancient Royal Forest of Windsor. The pastoral staves refer to the Sees of Winchester and Salisbury, the former held the whole of the Hundred of Wargrave and the Bishop of Salisbury had a Palace at Sonning. The mitre refers to the mitred Abbey of Abingdon which has links with the borough over a thousand years old, and to the ancient Saxon bishopric said to have existed at Sonning. The background is red, as is the upper part of the arms of Reading University, whose site is within the area at Earley.
The rural coronet is a special type of coronet designed for Rural District Councils and consisting of wheat ears and acorns alternately, representing agriculture and natural beauty. The acorn is especially appropriate to the Borough centred on Wokingham, whose emblem was an acorn long before the present arms - also based on the acorn - were granted. Out of the coronet rises a grassy mound on which stands a Royal lion, from the arms of the Royal County of Berkshire, holding an oar. The lion refers to various royal and national associations with the borough, including the world-famous Royal Regatta of Henley, which takes place within the borough and to which the oar refers.
The motto refers to the union of the various parishes in the former Rural District. It is a variant of the motto of the United States of America whose first President, George Washington, was descended in the maternal line from the family of Ball of Arborfield.


TOWN AND PARISH COUNCILS

ABINGDON TOWN COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Vert a Cross patonce Or between four Crosses pattée Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules out of a Mural Crown Or masoned Azure set between two Wings of the last a Stag's Head Gold in the mouth two Flashes (representing a Nuclear Flash) Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Swan wings elevated and addorsed proper standing on a Woolpack Gules in the beak a Tudor Rose slipped and leaved proper gorged with a Saxon Crown Or attached thereto a Church Bell Rope of the last reflexed over the back the dolley of alternate twists of Gules Argent and Azure and on the sinister side a like Swan standing on a Book bound Gules edged Or in the beak three Stalks of Barley proper gorged with an Ancient Crown Gold attached thereto a Church Bell Rope as on the dexter.

Motto 'FAITH AND INDUSTRY'.
Arms entered at the Visitations of 1566, 1623 and 1666. Crest and supporters granted 12th March 1962, to the Abingdon Borough Council.

abingdon tc arms

The green background and the four smaller silver crosses are taken from the arms of the Fraternity of the Holy Cross and the large gold cross is from the arms of Abingdon Abbey, which seems itself to have been suggested by the arms attributed to Edward the Confessor.
The mural crown represents local government and the stag's head represents Berkshire (Abingdon's County until 1974). The blue wings represent the Abingdon RAF base (that was, and is now Dalton army barracks) and the blue flashes allude to the nearby atomic energy research centre.
The swans represent the River Thames. The Tudor rose held by the left swan is for Queen Mary who granted Abingdon's first Royal Charter (1556) and the Saxon crown represents the town's saxon ancestry and it stands on a woolpack to show the long sheep farming and wool trading tradition. The barley held by the right swan is for the tradition of malting and brewing. It stands on a book for Abingdon's leather book binding and printing industry. The ropes are for rope making, and its crown comes from the time of Edward the confessor and Abingdon Abbey.
The motto refers to the Abbey and the Church in Abingdon (faith) and industry is for all these aforementioned industires and the more modern ones.


AMERSHAM TOWN COUNCIL (BUCKINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Argent on a Mount in base Vert a Wyvern sejant the dexter claw raised and the wings expanded Gules each semy of Plates on a Chief per pale Gules and Sable three Water-Wheels Gold.
CREST: In a Saxon Crown Or a demi Lion Gules holding in the dexter paw an eradicated Coral Wort (Cardamine Bulbifera) flowered proper; Mantled Gules doubled Argent
BADGE A Wyvern sejant the wings expanded Gules semy of Plates grasping in the dexter claw an eradicated Coral Wort (Cardamine Bulbifera) flowered proper.

Motto 'RES GESTAE RES FUTURAE' - Things past, things future.
Granted 19th June 1986.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

amersham tc arms

The arms are very similar to those of the former Amersham RDC, which covered a wider area than the present Town Council.
The red wyvern is from the heraldry of the Drake family of Shardeloes, who have been closely connected with the history of the Town. The white roundels on its wings are from the arms of the Penn family. The red and black of the chief are the liveries of the Earls and Dukes of Buckingham and the three water-wheels doubtless refer to the three water mills mentioned in the Domesday Book.
The Saxon crown is like that in the crest of the County Council.


AYLESBURY TOWN COUNCIL (BUCKINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Gyronny of six Gules and Sable a Mute Swan rousant proper on a Chief Or a Saxon Crown Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules issuant from a Wreath of plaited Straw a Mount thereon an Aylesbury Duck all proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Buck proper gorged with a Chain Or pendent therefrom a Hexagon Argent charged with a Garb Gules banded Or and on the sinister side a Stag also proper gorged with a Chain pendent therefrom a like Hexagon charged with a Crescent Sable.
BADGE An Oval gyronny of six Gules and Sable charged with a Saxon Crown Or issuant therefrom a Mount thereon an Aylesbury Duck proper the whole environed by a Garland of Beech Leaves Vert.

Motto 'SEMPER PRORSUM' - Always forward.
Granted 5th April 1964 to the Aylesbury Borough Council. Tranferred by Warrant dated 3rd April 2002.

aylesbury tc arms

No further information currently available.


BANBURY TOWN COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Azure a Sun in his Splendour Or on a Chief Ermine a Castle of two Towers between two Pairs of Swords points upwards in saltire Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours mounted upon a Horse passant Argent caparisoned Or and Gules a Lady in Tudor costume proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side an Ox Gules armed and unguled Or gorged with a Collar Argent charged with a Bar wavy Azure.

Motto 'DOMINUS NOBIS SOL ET SCUTUM' - The Lord is our sun and shield.
Granted 28th August 1951, to the Banbury Borough Council.

banbury tc arms

The shield is based upon the device borne upon the seal, which has been associated with the Borough for many years, namely the figure of the sun linked with the motto in a religious significance. The ermine of the chief commemorates the royal charters granted to the town at various times. The castle recalls the important part played by Banbury Castle in the Civil War, when two great sieges were laid against it in 1644 and 1646. It is shown with two towers in conventional heraldic style, in allusion to Leland's description of the castle as having "two wards". The crossed swords commemorate the Civil War sieges and also an important Roses battle in 1469, and these swords and the castle are all coloured red in keeping with the sanguinary warfare of those days.
The crest itself is simply "a fine lady upon a white horse", from the well-known rhyme which has made the name of Banbury a part of legend and folklore. She is depicted in Tudor costume in commemoration of Mary Tudor who granted the town a charter.
The red oxen refer to the Oxfordshire CC, whose arms at the time bore the head of a red ox taken from the "ox and ford" of the City of Oxford arms. They also refer to the important agricultural market of Banbury. The collars are similar to those now borne by the rams supporting the County arms.


BICESTER TOWN COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Barry nebuly Or and Gules a Hurt charged with a Fleur de Lys Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Fox’s Mask two Stalks of Wheat in Saltire leaved proper.

Motto 'UT TIBI SIC ALIIS' - Unto thyself so to others.
Granted 30th October 1959, to the Bicester Urban District Council.

bicester tc arms

No further information currently available.


BUCKINGHAM TOWN COUNCIL (BUCKINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Per pale Sable and Gules a Swan rousant wings inverted and expanded Argent ducally gorged Or.

Recorded at the Visitation of 1566 to the Borough of Buckingham. Used by the Town Council apparently without authority.

buckingham tc arms

The swan was a badge of the ancient family of De Bohn, and of the Giffards who were Earls of Buckingham, and then of the Staffords, the first Dukes of Buckingham. The last two families owned the important castle at Buckingham. The background shows the Stafford livery colours of red and black. The coronet is sometimes depicted with a chain attached.


CHESHAM TOWN COUNCIL (BUCKINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Per Fesse Or and Gules a Fesse counter-compony Argent and Sable between in chief two Beech Trees couped and in base a Swan rousant proper Ducally gorged chained and membered Gold.
CREST: Out of a Coronet composed of four Lilies and as many Chess Rooks alternately set upon a Rim Argent a Buck's head proper; Mantled Gules doubled Or.

Motto 'SERVE ONE ANOTHER'.
Granted 20th February 1961, to the Chesham Urban District Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

chesham tc arms

The colours gold, black, red, white and green reflect the colours of the County arms. The two beech trees represent the Chiltern woodlands, which have contributed so much to the prosperity of the town and the beauty of the neighbourhood. The black and white chequers refer to the River Chess, which takes its name from Chesham. The swan with outstretched wings and a golden collar is the emblem of Buckingham and of its Dukes.
The unique coronet of white lily-flowers, the principal emblem of St. Mary, Patron of Chesham, and chess rooks, a further reference to the River Chess. The chequers of the arms and the chess rooks both formed part of the device of the Council, before the arms were granted. The buck's head is derived from the supporter of both the County arms and those of the Cavendish family, who have been Barons Chesham since 1858.
The motto is from the Epistle to the Galatians, Chapter V, Verse 13.


DEDDINGTON PARISH COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

*ARMS: Gules upon a Cross engrailed Argent a Cross of the first in the first quarter a Wolf's Head erased all within a Bordure embattled Or.
*CREST: Upon a Wreath of the Colours the Battlements of a Tower Argent thereupon an Eagle wings displayed Or gorged with a Collar pendent therefrom a Chain Sable.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Bull Gules and on the sinister side a Horse Argent both armed and unguled Or and each resting the interior hoof upon a Garb Gold.

Motto 'ÞREO ON ANAN GEBUNDENE' - Three joined together in one.
Granted 16th April 1994.

dedington pc arms

The arms represent the three manors of the Parish - Castle of Windsor, Duchy and Christ Church - and these are symbolised on the shield by a red cross, a wolf's head and an engrailed cross, all enclosed within an embattled border, signifying a town, enclosed and protected.
The crest represents Deddington Castle and the chained eagle symbolises Piers Gaveston who was imprisoned there (or in Castle House) in 1312.
The ox and horse - represent the market (and also Oxfordshire) and the horsefair respectively. Sheaves of wheat represent local farming.
The motto is in Old English; Deddington was a settlement before the Norman Conquest. It means three joined together in one, which refers to the three manors and also, no doubt, to the three villages of the Parish - Deddington, Clifton and Hempton.
Deddington is the first Parish in all England, never having been a chartered borough, to have supporters granted to its arms.


DIDCOT TOWN COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Vert two Costs in bend sinister surmounted of two Costs in bend Argent between in chief a Gun Barrel in fesse two Garbs Or and in base a Ram's Head erased of the second armed Gold on a Chief Sable a Mitre also of the second.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Wreath of Hawthorn leaved and flowered a Roebuck's Head Proper.

Motto 'FAITH IN SERVICE'.
Granted 21st June 1952, to the Didcot Parish Council.

didcot tc arms

The crossed lines represent the connection with the railway and the canon represents the Royal Army Ordnance Depot, to show connection with the Army. The ram's head symbolises the connection that Didcot once had with the great wool sales from the sheep farms on the Berkshire Downs, also symbolised by the sheaf of corn. The mitre shows the link with Ralph de Dudcote of Dorchester whose effigy is in All Saints Church, Didcot.
The stag of Berkshire, Didcot's original county, forms the crest.


HENLEY TOWN COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.
BADGE: No information currently available.

Motto 'SEMPER COMMUNITAS' - A com­munity forever.
Granted 1974?.

henley tc arms

The shield is based upon the ancient seal that has been used by the Town Guardians of Henley and then by Henley Borough Council. The clouds from which radiate the rays of the sun was the royal badge of Edward III and has been used on Henley's seal since 1624.
The mural crown symbolises the town's borough status which extended from 1241 until 1974. It is charged with a fleur de lys, the symbol of St. Mary the Virgin to whom Henley's Parish Church is dedicated. The bishops' mitres, suggests the two episcopal benefactors of the town, Archbishop Laud and Bishop Longland. The Diamond Challenge Sculls denotes Henley's identifica­tion with the sport of rowing in general, and with the Royal Regatta in particular.
The lion is derived from that depicted on the town's seal from 1306, and the ox to denotes Henley's historic links with Oxford and Oxfordshire. The bugle horn hanging from a bowed string, is the regimental badge of the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry, with whom Henley men fought and fell in two world wars. The Tudor Rose is a badge of James I, who is traditionally treated as the founder of Henley Grammar School. The rose also denotes the rent that was annually paid to the crown for the Manor of Phyllis Court. The Catherine Wheel, the symbol of St. Catherine, who is 'the favourite saint of Henley' according to the historian Burn. The Bridgemen's Chantry was formerly in a chapel within Henley's Parish Church, dedicated to St. Catherine and endowed by the town with a considerable rental. The compartment denotes the town's situation in the region where the grass-covered Chilterns sweep down to the Thames.
The badge is a re-arrangement of the charges shown on the shield. A crowned letter H is shown within an oval surrounded by clouds from which radiate the rays of the sun.


MARLOW TOWN COUNCIL (BUCKINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Barry wavy of six Argent and Azure a Pale Sable over all in front of two Sculling Oars in saltire blades upwards Or a like Oar in pale Argent all entwined with a Wreath of Laurel proper on a Chief Azure a Celestial Crown Gold between two open Books proper edged and bound Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or Sable and Azure within a Coronet of the Norman period composed of four plain points three being manifest Gold each terminating in three Pearls one and two Argent and set upon a Rim Or a Mount Vert thereon a Mute Swan wings inverted and addorsed proper gorged with an Antique Crown of six points four being manifest and resting the dexter foot upon a Wheel Gold enfiled through the hub by a Flash of Lightning fesswise Azure and holding in the beak a Sprig of Shamrock with two leaves Vert; Mantled Sable and Azure doubled Or.
BADGE: A Fountain environed of a Wreath of Laurel and charged with a Mute Swan proper gorged with an Antique Crown of six points four being manifest Or and holding in the beak a Sprig of Shamrock with two leaves Vert.

Motto 'MALO OPTIMUM SEQUI' - I choose to strive for the best.
Granted 11th September 1989.

marlow tc arms
marlow badge
Badge

The black pale, forming a stylised bridge over the waves, along with the oars and laurel wreath symbolise Marlow's situation on the Thames and its associated activities. The celestial crown and the two books are symbolic of All Saints Church and other churches and its scholastic and literary connections.
The colours of the mantling are those of the Hobart and Willoughby families commemorated in the Parish Church. The Norman crown containing a grassy mound refers to William the Conqueror's wife, Queen Maud's tenure of land on which Marlow grew. The swan is that of the Earls and Dukes of Buckingham, familiar in the County's heraldry and as a former Marlow emblem, it holds a wheel transfixed by lightning to indicate the modern industries and has in it's beak a two-leaved shamrock in allusion to the Irish descent of Councillors McCall and Murray and in appreciation of their enthusiastic involvement in obtaining the Coat of Arms for the Town Council. The crown aound the swan's neck is formed of M's for Marlow.
The motto expresses Marlow's search for excellence and the spirit of it's Regatta and contains a typical heraldic play on the name.


NEWBURY TOWN COUNCIL (BERKSHIRE)

ARMS: Gules on a Fesse Argent between in chief a Teazle Flower between two Garbs and in base as many Swords in saltire points upwards Or a Bar wavy Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure a Castle of three Towers domed Gules flying from the centre tower a forked Pennant Argent charged with a Bar wavy Azure and from the exterior towers a Flag also Azure.

Motto 'FLORUIT FLOREAT' - May it flourish as it has flourished.
Granted 24th June 1948, the Newbury Borough Council.

newbury tc arms

The blue wavy bars represent the River Kennet. The teazle flower refers to the weaving industry, important to Newbury in the fifteenth and sixteenth century, which helped to establish the town as a manufacturing centre. The wheatsheaves represent agriculture and the swords allude to the two battles fought near Newbury during the Civil War in 1643 and 1644.
The castle represents the Norman stronghold.


ROMSEY TOWN COUNCIL (HAMPSHIRE)

ARMS: Quarterly Gules and Sable a Pastoral Staff in pale head to the sinister surmounted of a Portcullis chained Or.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Gules four Ears of Wheat and as many Ears of Barley alternately Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion queue fourchee ducally crowned Or supporting between the forelegs a Staff proper flying therefrom a Banner Argent charged with two Pallets Sable and on the sinister side a Hart Royal proper attired unguled and gorged with an ancient Crown Or and supporting between the forelegs a like Staff flying therefrom a Banner Azure charged with two Pallets wavy Argent over all a Mayfly proper.

Motto 'QUAE RECTA TENE' - Hold fast that which is right.
Granted 15th June 1959, to the Romsey Borough Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

romsey tc arms

Much of Romsey' s ancient history is bound up with that of Romsey Abbey and the design of the Arms, i.e. the shield, refers simply to this fact and to the Borough's royal assaciations. The red in the quartered shield alludes to the latter; the black to the Benedictine Abbey. Displayed in gold upon this red and black field is a crosier (or pastoral staff) of an Abbess surmounted of a Portcullis, the emblem long used by Romsey Corporation as its Common Seal. To emphasise the civic status and dignity of Romsey, the Crest embodies a red mural crown masoned sable (colours of the field of the shield) out of which spring ears of golden wheat and barley alternately in reference respectively to Agriculture and to Brewing, the principal industry of the Borough. The dexter Supporter portrays, in compliment to Romsey's High Steward, Admiral of the Fleet the Earl Mountbatten K.G., the Hessian Lion supporting a Banner of the Mountbatten Arms: "Argent two pallets sable" The sinister Supporter depicts a Hart Royal, with antlers and hooves of gold and with an ancient crown about its neck, into which may be read some allusion toKing John's Hunting Lodge. The hart supports a blue banner chargedwith two white wavy pallets over which is set a Mayfly symbolising the River Test and its celebrated trout fishing.


WALLINGFORD TOWN COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Gules a Portcullis Or studded Sable chained Argent ensigned with an Ancient Crown of the second all within an Orle of Bezants.
CREST: Issuant from Water barry wavy a Port between two Towers proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Knight in Armour proper wearing a Surcoat of the Arms mounted on a Horse Argent caparisoned of the Arms holding in the dexter gauntlet a Tilting Spear Sable his helmet bearing the Crest.

Granted 23rd August 1955, to the Borough of Wallington (then in Berkshire).

Images courtesy of The Heraldry Society.

wallingford tc arms

The portcullis has been used as the Mayor's seal for over 300 years and appears on all the Town Regalia, it is shown in gold referring to the fact that at one time there was a Royal Mint in Wallingford. The crown refers to the fact that in the time of the Plantaganets Wallingford was closely associated with royalty, being a Royal Borough. The bezants or golden roundelss are taken from the arms of the Duchy of Cornwall of which Wallingford was a part, from the time of the Black Prince until Henry VIII. There are eleven bezants, which record the century of the granting of the Charter in 1155.
The crest refers to the River Thames and the Castle.
The Supporters are taken from the Knight which appears on the Common Seal of the Borough which has been in use for over 300 years.


WITNEY TOWN COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Vert on a Fess wavy Argent between in chief a sinister Glove of the last between two Leopards' Faces each holding in the mouth a Shuttle Or and in base a representation of the Butter Cross at Witney Gold a Barrulet wavy Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Mount Vert between a Crescent and a Star Or a Paschal Lamb proper.

Motto 'INGENIO FLOREMUS' - .
Granted 9th September 1955, to the Witney Urban District Council.

witney tc arms

The white and blue wavy band on a green background represents the surrounding countryside and the River Windrush on which the town stands. For centuries Witney has been associated with blankets and in 1711 the weavers obtained a charter from Queen Anne incorporating them as a Company and Blanket Hall was built in the High Street. Here all blankets had to be taken for measuring and weighing, thus ensuring that the very high quality of the blankets was maintained. The two leopard's faces holding shuttles are from the Blanket Makers arms, which appears beneath the one-handed clock on Blanket Hall. The glove represents the gloving industry, for which the town is also famous. At the base is the Buttercross that stands in the heart of Witney, it is said to be the base of an ancient preaching cross - of uncertain age.
The Paschal lamb was used as a device before the arms were granted and the mount on which it stands can be seen as refering to the site (know as the Mount), where the Bishops of Winchester built a palace some time between 1047 and 1070.


WOKINGHAM TOWN COUNCIL (BERKSHIRE)

ARMS: Or semée of Acorns Vert a Chevron Ermine thereon a Tudor Rose barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Saxon Crown Or a demi Stag at gaze proper supporting a Crosier Or.

Motto 'E GLANDE QUERCUS' - From the acorn, the Oak.
Granted 29th September 1953, to the former Wokingham Borough Council.

wokingham tc arms

The acorns on a gold shield, represent Wokingham as the Forest Town. The ermine chevron referes the the Royal House, and the Tudor Rose is part of the badge of Elizabeth I and the present Queen, both allude to the fact that the arms were granted to the Borough in Coronation Year, 1953.
The Saxon Crown, represents the Saxon origin of the town, with the Berkshire stag, supporting a Bishop's crozier, refer­ring to the ownership of the town by the Bishop of Salisbury to 1612.


WOODSTOCK TOWN COUNCIL (OXFORDSHIRE)

ARMS: Gules the Stump of a Tree couped and eradicated Argent and in chief three Stags' Heads caboshed of the same all within a Bordure of the last charged with eight Oak Leaves Vert.
CREST: Out of a Ducal Coronet Or an Oak Tree proper leaved Vert.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Savage proper wreathed about the head and loins with Oak Leaves Vert holding over his exterior shoulder a Club proper.

Motto 'RAMOSA CORNUA CERVI' - The branching horns of the stag.
Recorded at the Visitation of 1634. Certified painting obtained in 1949, for the Woodstock Borough Council.

woodstock tc arms

The tree-stock was adopted by Edward III, as an obvious rebus, as one of his badges in allusion to the royal manor of Woodstock. The name of the town means "a place in the woods" and with the royal forest of Wychwood stretching from the town west and north towards the Cotswolds, the hunting lodge on the doorstep, and the "Great Park of Woodstock" it fitting that the town adopted the other emblems.
The motto is from Virgil, Eclogues, vii, c. 305; the reference is to the horns of a stag given as an offering to Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt.


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