NORTHERN IRELAND 1973 TO 2015

ANTRIM BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.

Motto 'PER ANGUSTA AD AUGUSTA' - Through hard times to prosperity.
Granted ?.

The Borough of Antrim was formed by the amalgamation of the Antrim Rural District (part) and the Ballymena Rural District (part).

Picture and information from Heraldry of the World.

antrim bc arms

The division of the shield into green and alternate waves of white and blue, symbolises the rural areas and Lough Neagh and Six-Mile-Water. On the base stands a castle gateway like that leading to the Castle at Antrim, and behind it rises the Round Tower. Two gold sheaves of barley, each behind a gold shuttle, flank each side of the castle referencing the ancient linen-making and more modern textile industries.
The red eagle with gold beak is from the arms of the Pakenham family, the Norman family of de Courcy and is connected with the priory at Muckamore's history. The gold cross moline is that of the Viscount Templetown of Templepatrick.
The supporters represent the two great families of the area, the Massereenes and the O'Neills. The black stags, with gold hooves and antlers, have a ribbon of nylon about their necks alluding to the local importance of British Enkalon and from each hangs a chaplet of gold roses. The stags are a variation of the supporters of the Viscounts Massereene and Ferrard, and are derived from the crest of their ancestors and Clotworthys, so important in the early days of Antrim. Each stag holds in the mouth the sword from the O'Neills of Shane's Castle's crest.
The motto is that of the Massereene family and was also used by the Antrim County Council.


ARDS BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per saltire Argent and Azure in chief an Eagle displayed Gules crowned Or in fesse two Fleurs-de-Lys of the last and in base a Cross Moline Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours within and issuant from a Crescent Or a dexter Hand Gules grasping a Fleur-de-Lys Gold.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Unicorn and on the sinister side a Lion Or each supporting a Pastoral Staff Sable.

Motto 'FIDELIS ATQUE FORTIS' - Faithful and Brave.
Granted 29th August 1952 to the Newtownards BC.

The Borough of Ards was formed by the amalgamation of the Donaghdee Urban District, the East Down Rural District (part), the Borough of Newtownards and the North Down Rural District (part).

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

ards bc arms

Use is made of the former Borough of Newtownards's arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. The shield is parted diagonally in the shape of St. Andrew's cross and what is popularly known as St. Patrick's cross. This partition alludes to the Scottish origin of the Montgomerys also to the Charter of 1613 granted to the Town of Newtownards by King James I. The emblems are taken from the arms of the families who have held Newtownards the main town of the area. The eagle is that of the de Courcys who invaded Ulster in the twelfth century. John de Courcy built the castle round which Newtownards developed. The fleurs-de-lys on blue are from the shield of the Montgomerys, Earls of Mount-Alexander; Sir Hugh Montgomery came into the Newtownards Priory property in 1608, and Newtown House descended from them to the Colvilles, whose black mill-rind cross occupies the base of the shield.
The crest-wreath and mantling are in the livery colours of the arms, blue and white. Upon this is the Montgomery crest, with the hand coloured red in allusion to the familiar Red Hand of Ulster.
The unicorn and lion are royal beasts in allusion to the Charter of 1613; the unicorn was brought into the Royal Arms by King James. Each supporter, however, has another significance - the unicorn is akin to the supporters of the arms of the modern de Courcys, and the lion is the sinister supporter of the arms of the Marquesses of Londonderry, who have been so long associated with the history and development of Newtownards. The beasts support crosiers in allusion to the two monastic foundations associated with the town - Movilla Abbey, said to have been founded by St. Finian in 540, and the Priory founded by Walter de Burgh in the thirteenth century. The crosiers are black, the predominant colour of the habit of the Augustinians and Dominicans to which these foundations respectively belonged.
The grassy bank on which the supporters stand has flax flowers and roses growing from it in reference to two industries for which the area has been well-known - linen weaving and floriculture.
The motto is adapted from that of the Savages of Portaferry, one of the most ancient of Ulster families.


ARMAGH CITY AND DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure on a Bend embattled between in chief a Primatial Cross and in base a Harp Or a Bendlet Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours an Ancient Irish Crown Gold.

Motto 'IN CONCILIO CONSILIUM' - In council we plan.
Granted 10th December 1958, to the former City of Armagh UDC.

The City and District of Armagh was formed by the amalgamation of the Armagh Rural District, the City of Armagh Urban District, the Keady Urban District, the Lurgan Rural District (part), the Newry No2 Rural District (part), the Tandragee Rural District and the Tandragee Urban District.

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

armagh city and dc arms

Use is made of the former City of Armagh's arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. The Primatial Cross represents the city's foundation by St. Patrick in the year AD 444 and its position as the ecclesiastical capital of Ireland. It also commemorates the fact that from early times Armagh was the greatest of Ireland's schools of learning, and emphasises the importance of the Book of Arinagh, the earliest datable manuscript of the Christian period, compiled in AD 807. The Embattled Bend stresses the civic character of the arms and particularly refers to the request in 1226 by King Henry Ill to the then Archbishop Netterville for a site in the city to build a castle, a building now demolished but still giving name to one of Armagh's oldest streets. The Harp perpetuates the Seal of the Charter granted by King james I in 1613 and in use from that date to the present, thus reminding all and sundry that the city was a market town of some standing from the year 1467 when King Edward IV granted a fresh patent to Archbishop Bole. This was a confirmation of an earlier one, the date of which is now unknown.
The Irish Crown as a crest signifies that the ancient territory of Emain Macha was the seat of the Kings of Ulster from 350 BC to AD 332, and the location of Ireland's most famous order of chivalry, the Red Branch Knights. The Crown also recognises Armagh as a place of regal interments down the centuries, especially of Brian Boru in 1014, and in 1022 of his successor, Mael Sechlainn, (Malachy of the Golden Collar).


BALLYMENA BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure seven Towers three in pale with two in chief and as many in base Or.

Motto 'POST PRAELIA PRAEMIA' - After the battles come the rewards.
Granted 26t August 1953 to the former Ballymena BC.

The Borough of Ballymena was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Ballymena and the Ballymena Rural District (part).

ballymena bc arms

Use is made of the former Borough of Ballymena's arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. Known locally as the 'City of the Seven Towers' due to its highly visible seven towers in bygone days. The seven towers, named such by Sir Shafto Adair were: Ballymena Castle, First Ballymena Presbyterian Church, The Old Parish Church, The Braid Water Mill, St. Patrick's Church, the Old Town Hall and All Saints Roman Catholic Church.


BALLYMONEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.

Motto 'GOOD WILL TO ALL PEOPLE'.
Granted ?.

The Borough of Ballymoney was formed by the amalgamation of the Ballymoney Rural District (part) and the Ballymoney Urban District.

ballymoney bc arms

The division of the shield per saltire and coloured blue and white, alludes to St. Andrew’s cross, and thereby to Ballymoney’s connection with Scotland. The red crosses are taken from the arms and crest of the MacDonnells and the wheatsheaf refers to agriculture. The tower represents Ballymoney’s old church tower. The curlew denotes the wildlife in the Ballymoney area and an heraldic fountain represents the Altnahinch Dam and Garry Bog.
The horse features as a supporter to the arms of Lord Macartney, and the boar indicates Ballymoney’s bacon industry. The mural crowns with which the supporters are gorged refer to the Council’s borough status.


BANBRIDGE DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per fess Vert and barry wavy Azure and Argent a representation of the Bridge over the River Bann in chief a Spindle and a Shuttle in saltire Or between two Mussels Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure issuant from a Mural Crown Gules charged with an Escallop Argent a Garb Or between two Branches of Oak leaved and fructed proper.

Motto 'PER DEUM EN INDUSTRIUM' - By God and industry.
Granted 5th May 1964 to the Banbridge UDC.

The District of Banbridge was formed by the amalgamation of the Banbridge Rural District, the Banbridge Urban District and the Dromore UDC.

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

banbridge dc arms

Use is made of the former Banbridge UDC's arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. The shield is divided horizontally, the top half has a green field, which may be taken to represent the bleach greens of the Bann, and the lower half of blue and white waves for the River Bann itself. Across the centre of the shield is a representation of the bridge over the River Bann. On the green top half are shuttles and spindle in saltire representing the spinning and weaving linen trade—these between two freshwater mussels represent the ancient Banbridge pearl fisheries.
The wreath is of the town livery colours, white or silver and blue on which rests a mural crown, representing a walled city, and generally granted to towns and cities. On this are escallop shells — taken from the arms of the Downshire family, the original ground landlords, and generally representing a pilgrim. Above this is a garb or sheaf of wheat or corn, representing farming — this between representations of fructed oak trees, which commemorate the old oak forests of Banbridge.
The motto represents the town's trust in God and industry.


CASTLEREAGH BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per chevron Azure and Or in chief two Cogwheels of the last and in base a sinister Hand appaumée couped Gules.
*CREST: Issuant from a Rural Crown Or a Leyland Cypress Tree (Cupressocyparis x leylandii) proper; Mantled Azure doubled Or.
*SUPPORTERS: On either side an Irish Elk proper gorged with a Mural Crown Or.

Motto 'CREATE AND CONSERVE'.
Granted 1977.

The Borough of Castlereagh was formed by the amalgamation of the Castlereagh Rural District (part), the Hillsborough Rural District (part) and the North Down Rural District (part).

Picture from Heraldry of the World and information from Flags of the World.

castlereagh bc arms

The red hand in the base of the shield is taken from the O'Neill arms and records the early history of Castlereagh. The Caisleán Riabhach or "grey castle" that gives its name to the area was built about 1350 by Aodh Flann O'Neill. The castle and land was abandoned by the O'Neills in 1618 and the castle no longer exists. The cogwheels in chief represent modern industrial development in the Borough.
The rural crown is from the arms of the Castlereagh RDC and the Leyland cypress, of the variety "Robinson Gold", was chosen to represent the Borough as the Forest Service of Northern Ireland states that it is unique to the area. It also features in the centre of the medallion on the chain of the Mayor. The Irish elks, like that in the crest of the Castlereagh RDC, is common to the arms of County Down and Northern Ireland.


COLERAINE BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent a Chevron Azure in chief two Garbs and in base a Salmon naiant proper a Chief barry wavy of the first and second thereon a Pale of the first charged with a Saltire Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Mound Vert a Castle with two Towers proper charged with a dexter Hand couped Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Dragon per fesse Argent and Gules charged on the wing with a Sword erect of the last.

Motto 'CUIL RATHAIN'.
Granted 24th October 1951 the former Coleraine BC.

The Borough of Coleraine was formed by the amalgamation of the Ballymoney Rural District (part), the former Borough of Coleraine, the Coleraine Rural District, the Portrush Urban District and the Portstewart Urban District.

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

coleraine bc arms

Use is made of the former Borough of Colraines's arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. The red cross is the cross of St Patrick who is claimed to have given Coleraine its name - Cuil Rathain. The blue wavy lines on each side of the cross represent a port or harbour, of which there are four in the Borough. The wheat sheaves represent agriculture in the Borough and the fish denotes the salmon found in the River Bann.
The castle of the crest refers to the former 11-15th century Norman Castle as well as to the 16-17th century earthen ramparts of the planned town. For difference it is charge with the red hand of Ulster.
The dragons supporters, like those of the former Londonderry County Council, originate from the heraldry of the City of London.
The Name Cuil Rathain has been interpreted as the "Corner of the Ferns". The other and more probable translation of the town name, based on 'Cuil Rath Na Ene' is "little fort on the corner" referring to the prominent ancient earthen rath at Mountsandel situated on a very distinct bend of the River Bann near the Salmon Leap.


COOKSTOWN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per chevron Vert and Azure in chief two Garbs proper and in base a Cogwheel and on a Chief Or a Port between two Towers proper between two dexter Hands couped Gules.
CREST: A Phoenix rising from Flames proper in the beak a Cogwheel Gules, Mantled Vert doubled Or.

Motto 'FORWARD'.
Granted 6th August 1969 to the Cookstown UDC.

The District of Cookstown was formed by the amalgamation of the Cookstown Rural District, the Cookstown Urban District and the Magherafelt Rural District (part).

Picture and information from Heraldry of the World and Briggs.

cookstown dc arms

Use is made of the former Cookstown's UDC arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. The cogwheel in a blue base symbolises industry, in particular the old linen industry centred along the Ballinderry River, and the sheaves of grain on a green background symbolise agriculture. The castle represents Killymoon Castle built by James Stewart in 1671. The colours chosen represent the agriculture significance of the District and the blue represents that vast inland sea to the east of the District, Lough Neagh.
The phoenix rising from flames symbolises the rebuilding of the present town in the mid-18th century from the ashes of the Old Town which was almost completely destroyed by fire in the recapture of the Lissan ironworks where the rebels had forged many of their weapons. The crest also includes the Red Hand of Ulster, symbolising the Earldom of the O'Neills who were crowned Kings of Ulster at Tullyhogue Fort up until the late 15th century.


CRAIGAVON BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale dancetty Gules and Or in dexter chief and sinister base a dexter Hand within four Batons masclewise the ends overlapping each other and in sinister chief and dexter base a Roundel charged with an Annulet the outer edge embattled all counterchanged.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules a Mural Crown Or statant thereon a Greyhound Sable with a white flash on its chest supporting over the dexter shoulder with the dexter foreleg a Railway Wheel Tapper Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Unicorn Argent armed unguled maned crined tufted and gorged with a Chain Or pendent therefrom a Stalk of the Flax flowered and leaved proper and on the sinister side an Heraldic Antelope Gules armed unguled tufted and gorged with a Chain Or pendent therefrom a representation of the Clogh Bann or 'Bell of the Parish of Seagoe' proper; the whole upon a Compartment composed of a Grassy Mound proper semy of Apples stalked and leaved and trefoils Or and charged with a Pale barry wavy Argent and Azure.

Motto 'TOGETHER WE PROGRESS'.
Granted 1st October 1973?.

The District of Craigavon was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Lurgan, the Borough of Portadown, the Moira Rural District (part) and the Lurgan Rural District (part).

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

craigavon bc arms

The indented division of the shield is intended to show the union of two boroughs. The red hand of Ulster is shown within a lozenge formed of interwoven strands to represent weaving. The roundels suggest coins for commerce and are charged with cogwheels for industry. The red and gold colours suggest blood and sweat or the rewards of work.
The mural crown is a symbol of municipal government and on this stands a greyhound. This represents Master McGrath, the famous greyhound owned by the Brownlow family of Lurgan and three times winner of the Waterloo Cup, and who inspired a song. He supports a wheeltapper, to represent the important railway junction at Portadown.
The supporters are a unicorn, inspired by the arms of Borough of Lurgan, wearing a chain from which hangs a flax flower for the traditional linen industry and a heraldic antelope from the arms of the Borough of Portadown, in reference to the Dukes of Manchester, who owned the land. The antelope bears the Seagoe Bell, dating back to approximately 900 AD, it is a hand bell, possibly made for Cumascach, who was known to have dwelt in Armagh.
The compartment is broken by barry wavy water for the River Bann and Craigavon Lakes, while the grass represents the rural areas of Craigavon. The grass is semée of golden apples and shamrocks. The apples are grown locally, while the shamrocks remind us that the district is in Ireland.


DERRY CITY COUNCIL

ARMS: Sable a Human Skeleton Or seated upon a Mossy Stone proper in dexter chief a Castle triple towered Argent on a Chief of the last a Cross Gules [charged with a Harp Or] and in the first quarter a Sword erect also Gules.
BADGE: An Oak Leaf proper (being of a shade known as Londonderry Green) veined and charged with a Pale wavy Sable environed by a Mural Crown Murrey masoned Or.
*STANDARD: Ermine the bands Vert and inscribed VITA VERITS VICTORIA Argent fringed Or and Sable.

Motto 'VITA VERITS VICTORIA' - Life truth victory.
Confirmed by Daniel Molyneux, Ulster King of Arms on 1st June 1623. Certified by Garter and Norroy and Uldter Kings of Arms on 28th April 1953. Badge (and presumably Standard) granted 17th May 1983.

The City of Derry was formed by the amalgamation of the former City of Londonderry and the Londonderry Rural District (abolished in 1969, with the Londonderry Development Commission taking over municipal functions). The City was renamed Derry in 1984.

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

derry city arms
derry badge
Badge

The District was known as Londonderry until 1984. The skeleton or death figure is believed to represent Walter de Burgo, a young Anglo-Norman knight and nephew of the Red Earl, Richard de Burgo. The young knight, following a bitter feud involving his cousin William de Burgo, Earl of Ulster, was captured by the latter, and imprisoned in a dungeon at Greencastle in County Donegal where he starved to death in 1332. The castle depicted in the upper corner of the arms is believed to be a representation of Greencastle. The reason for Walter de Burgo's appearance on the arms is thought to be due to the fact that Edward II granted Walter's uncle, Richard, perpetual ownership of Inishowen and the Island of Derry in 1311.
Several other explanations of the death figure exist, which, while noteworthy, have been largely discounted. One was that it was Sir Cahir O'Doherty, the Irish chieftain, who in 1608 siezed and sacked Derry in revenge for being insulted by the Government of Derry. Sir Cahir, however was never imprisoned by the English but was killed in a skirmish at Doon Rock near Kilmacrenan in 1608. Moreover, records state that the lower part of the arms - the black shield with the castle and skeleton, seated on a large stone - was in existence when Sir Henry Dowcra made the first plantation of Derry in 1600. This dating of the arms also rules out the notion that the death figure is connected with the Siege of Derry in 1689.
The meaning of the red cross and sword is known for certain. They are the sword of St Paul and the Cross of St George and are the original arms of the City of London. They were added to the arms of Derry in 1613 when the cities became linked during the Plantation of Ulster.
In 1952 the then Londonderry Corporation decided that the surviving records (dated 1613 and thought to be summaries of the original grant document, now lost) were insufficient authority for the continued bearing of the arms. Thus it sought and obtained from the College of Arms a certificate of Confirmation. This confirmed the existing Arms on the grounds of their long usage and in the belief that a proper grant had been intended to be made in 1613. It omitted to confirm, however, one device which had been part of the Arms in use at least since 1613. This was a harp, which was placed in the centre of the Red Cross. Consequently, the harp had not been used since 1952. In 2002 the College of Arms and Norroy & Ulster King of Arms issued letters patent restoring the harp to the arms. Note both versions are shown here.
The oak leaf of the badge alludes to the ancient name Doire meaning "Place of Oaks", the wavy black pale represents the River Foyle encircled by the Walls.


DUNGANNON AND SOUTH TYRONE BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.
BADGE: No information currently available.

Granted ?.

The Borough of Dungannon and South Tyrone was formed by the amalgamation of the Armagh Rural District (part), the Clogher Rural District (part), the Dungannon Urban District and the Dungannon Rural District. The district was originally named just Dungannon, and took its subsequent name on 25th November 1999, after petitioning the Secretary of State for the Environment.

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

dungannon and south tyrone bc arms
dungannon and south tyrone badge
Badge

The arms divided by chevron into gold and black. The gold section bears a castle with towers charged with a red right hand emphasising that Dungannon, that is 'Fort of Gannon', was a stronghold of the O'Neils. Below on a black division has been set an ancient crown and this alludes to the Knockmany Chambered Cairn which according to Meek's account received its name because it was the hill on which Queen Baine, wife of King Tuathal Techtmar was buried. The crown on the black background denotes the royal burial.
Upon the wreath in the main colours of the shield are a shuttle, denoting the association with the local linen industry and four flax stalks one for each of the four former Districts.
The supporters are a red lion for O'Neil and on the right a wolf for Chichester. These commemorate the important association of these two families, as it was to Chichester that the King in 1612 granted a charter of incorporation for the town.
The badge is composed of four red crowns (civic authority) linked with a golden chain within which is set a dexter red hand.


FERMANAGH DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.

Motto 'FERMANAGH'.
Granted ?.

The District of Fermanagh was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Enniskillen, the Enniskillen Rural District, the Irvinestown Rural District and the Lisnakea Rural District.

Image thanks to Gerry Stevens.

fermanagh dc arms

No information currently available.


LARNE BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Sable on Water barry wavy in base a four-masted Ship in full sail proper on a Chief Or a Castle between two Shuttles palewise also proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Sable an Arm embowed grasping a Corran proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Swan charged on the breast with a Flax Flower proper.

Motto 'FALCE MARIQUE POTENS' - Industry by land and sea.
Granted 29th August 1952 to the former Larne BC.

The Borough of Larne was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Larne and the Larne Rural District (part).

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

larne bc arms

Use is made of the former Borough of Larne's arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. The ship in full sail on the heraldic representation of water was the original though unregistered crest of the Town. The Castle, which is generally supposed to have been built about the twelfth century, took its name from the Lough, which had been called by the Danes 'Wulfrichford', changing later to 'Wolderfryth', 'Wulverfleete', 'Ulderfleete', and finally 'Olderfleet'. The present ruins are seventeenth century. The weaver's shuttles depict the linen lndustry.
The 'corran' is the Irish name for a reaping hook or sickle, the handle is a more or less crude piece of wood and has a leather thong looped from the top to the bottom of it which goes over the knuckles of the hand. The Curran Ward is a district of Larne which stretches into Larne Lough in the form of a Corran.
The use of swans as supporters is a reference to 'Swan Island' situated in Larne Lough, which abounds with swans. The Swans were charged with flax flowers for difference, as swans are used as supporters for the Marquis of Ailsa.


LIMAVADY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.

Motto 'ABSIT INVIDIA' - Let there be no ill-will.
Granted ?.

The Borough of Limavady was formed by the amalgamation of the Limavady Rural District (part) and the Limavady Urban District.

limavady bc arms

The lower half of the shield uses the arms of the old Limavady UDC. It shows two crossed bands with shells, taken from the arms of the Connolly family who owned all the land around Limavady from 1697. The wavy blue band in the upper part of the shield is taken from the Phillips arms. The Phillips family also owned all the land around Limavady until they sold it to the Connolly clan. As the Phillips had received the land as a grant from James I (in 1612) they must have made a tidy profit from the transaction. The same blue band also features in the arms of the Haberdashers' Company, who owned a lot of land around Ballykelly. On the blue band are two sets of crossed fish, which were taken from the arms of the O'Cahan family and the Fishmongers' Company. Between the fish sits St. Columba in his boat. He came to visit the Convention of Drumceatt in 575, just outside the town travelling up the River Roe.
The mural crown denotes the Borough status of the council. Inside this is a rock from which an Irish wolfhound leaps, refering to the town's name from the Irish Léim a' Mhadaidh, meaning "leap of the dog". The dog is carrying a broken lance from the crest of the Phillips family.
The supporters are from the Phillips and O'Cahan arms. On the left is a cat-a-mountain for O'Cahan joined on the right by a black lion for Phillips.


LISBURN CITY COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure on a Cross flory fitchy quadrate Or a Mitre Azure between in dexter chief a Weaver's Shuttle Argent threaded Or and in the sinister base an Ostrich's Head erased Argent in the beak a Horseshoe Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Mural Crown Gules between two Sprigs of Flax flowered proper perched on the battlements a Gamecock Sable combed and wattled Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Phoenix Sable beaked Or enflamed proper and murally crowned Gules.

Motto 'EX IGNE RESURGAM' - I will arise out of the fire.
Granted on 15th November 1966 to the former Lisburn BC.

The City of Lisburn was formed by the amalgamation of the Hillsborough Rural District (part), the former Borough of Lisburn and the Lisburn Rural District. Formerly a borough, Lisburn was granted city status in 2002 as part of Queen Elizabeth II's Golden jubilee celebrations.

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

lisburn city arms

Use is made of the former Borough of Lisburn's arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. The fleur-de-lys on the extremities of the cross refer to the city's historic connection with the Huguenots, fleur-de-lys forming the French Royal arms. The bishop's mitre is reference to the fact that for three centuries there has been a cathedral in Lisburn. The weaver's shuttle and the sprigs of flax are symbolic of the linen industry. The ostrich head with the horseshoe on its beak are from the arms of Sir Richard Wallace and refer to his fame as a collector.
The mural crown, that is the crown in thee form of a wall with battlements, is the badge of the municipality. The gamecock is punning reference to the old name of the town - Lisnagarvey - "the fort of the gamesters or gamblers".
The two phoenix rising from the flames and the motto refer to the fact that the town was twice burnt down and rebuilt in its early days.


MOYLE DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.

Granted ?.

The District of Moyle was formed by the amalgamation of the Ballycastle Urban District, the Ballycastle Rural District and the Ballymoney Rural District (part).

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

moyle dc arms

The main colours of the shield are green and gold. The green illustrates the fertile farmlands of the area, as well as being a colour usually associated with Ireland. The gold represents both the colour of Irish Whiskey and the sandy beaches of this coastal region. The white and blue wavy edges to the central 'Pale' show that water is an important feature of the area. The central device of a Tower on a lozenge refers to Ballycastle, the centre of the area, the main square of which is known as the 'Diamond'. Above and below this are black lymphads or galleys which feature in the arms of the MacDonnells, the chief clan in the Glens of Antrim since the fourteenth century. On either side of the central Pale are stylised stills representing Bushmills distillery.
The hand in the crest with the fingers turned down is a tribute to Colonel Boyd who developed the town of Ballycastle in the eighteenth century; the lightning flashes are a reference to Guglielmo Marconi who sent the first wireless messages across water between Rathlin Island and Kenmara House in Ballycastle in 1898; the alternate black diamonds and sheaves of corn refer to coal mining and the Lammas Fair (which is a harvest festival) respectively.
The wolf supporter is a reference to County Antrim and the wolfhound refers to Ireland generally. The glass-blowing pipe and bottle refer to the former glass industry at Ballycastle, while the anchor indicates that the town is a harbour.
The coat of arms is completed by a representation of the Giant's Causeway, a World Heritage site, shown rising out of stylised water.


NEWTOWNABBEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale Vert and Sable Goutté d'Or overall a Mitre Argent its infulae fringed Gold.
CREST: On a two-headed Phoenix Gules beaked Or rising from Flames proper issuant from a Mural Crown Gold a Crozier also Gold; Mantled Gules doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: Dexter a demi-Eagle Gules beaked Or armed Azure collared checky Gules and Or attached to a demi-Lion rampant Sable armed Gules one paw resting on a Cog-Wheel sinister a demi-Griffin Sable beaked Or armed and langued Gules collared checky Gules and Or attached to a demi-Lion rampant Gules armed Azure one paw resting on a Garb party per pale Or and Azure.

Motto 'MULTI IN UNO RESURGENT' - Many arise as one.
Granted 1976.

The Borough of Newtownabbey was formed by the amalgamation of the Antrim Rural District (part), the Ballyclare Urban District, the Larne Rural District (part) and the Newtownabbey Urban District (part).

Picture and information from Heraldry of the World.

newtownabbey bc arms

The green and black background represents agriculture and industry and the golden drops the wealth extracted from them. The abbot's mitre refers to the abbey which was founded here in the 13th Century giving the name to Whiteabbey.
The phoenix has two heads as the creation of Newtownabbey was in two stages. The first head of the phoenix (facing dexter) refers to the original seven villages and the second head (facing sinister) to the additional villages. The red colour of the phoenix is taken from the arms of John de Courcey and is a reminder that he built the castle at Carrickfergus and installed Norman rule in the area.
The upper half of the dexter supporter, the red demi-eagle with a gold beak, represents the de Courcys and the lower half, the black demi-lion, represents the de Burghs. Its paw rests on a cogwheel, symbolic of light industry. The upper half of the sinister supporter, the black demi-griffin with a gold beak, represents the Grimshaws and the lower half, the red demi-lion, represents the O'Neills. Its paw rests on a garb divided gold and blue, symbolic of agriculture. Both wear red and gold checked collars, representing Sir Edward Chichester, the 1st Viscount Chichester, who held large grants of land in the area.


NORTH DOWN BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules two Lymphads in pale Or each with a Sail Argent charged with a dexter Hand couped of the field all between as many flaunches barry wavy Argent and Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Figure representing St. Comgall vested as an Abbot of the sixth century reading an open Book held in his dexter hand and supporting with his sinister hand a Pastoral Staff the crook resting on his shoulder all proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Dolphin Vert finned Or the dexter charged with a Bezant thereon a Trefoil slipped also Vert and the sinister with a Bezant thereon a Bull's Head caboshed proper.

Motto 'BEANNCHOR'.
Granted 5th April 1951 to the Bangor BC.

The Borough of North Down was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Bangor, the Castlereagh Rural District (part), the Holywood Urban District and the North Down Rural District (part).

Picture and information from Heraldry of the World and Briggs.

north down bc arms

Use is made of the former Borough of Bangor's arms, I don't know if this was officially sanctioned. The two ships, which feature the Red Hand of Ulster on their sails, denote that the area is a coastal district in the Province of Ulster. The wavy blue bars show that Bangor is a seaside town.
The crest shows a haloed St Comgall, founder of the town's abbey, who was an important figure in the spread of Christianity.
The supporting dolphins, further signify Bangor's links with the sea. Each is charged with a gold roundle; the left featuring a shamrock to represent Ireland, and the right featuring a bull's head, in reference to the derivation of the town's name, possibly from the Irish word Beannchor (modern Irish Beannchar) meaning a horned or peaked curve or perhaps a staked enclosure, as the shape of Bangor Bay resembles the horns of a bull.


OMAGH DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: No information currently available.
CREST: No information currently available.
SUPPORTERS: No information currently available.
BADGE: No information currently available.

Motto 'OIGH MAIGH'.
Granted ?.

The District of Omagh was formed by the amalgamation of the Clogher Rural District (part), the Omagh Rural District (part) and the Omagh Urban District.

Image and information thanks to Gerry Stevens.

omagh dc arms
omagh badge
Badge

The green background with the white reversed 'pall' or Y-shaped figure, represents the confluence of the Drumragh and Camowen Rivers to form the Strule. The rural areas around Omagh are suggested by two gold bulls' heads, each enclosed within a garland of ears of wheat resembling the letter 'O', to represent mixed farming. Each garland has ten ears, so the total of twenty corresponds to the number of wards constituting the new District. The stylised gold three-towered castle, suggests the stronghold of the O'Neills, and also indicates the history of Omagh as a fortress and garrison town since the mid-fifteenth century.
The crest-wreath and mantling are in the basic colours of the shield, green and white. In front of a hill representing the hills, especially the Sperrin Mountains, stand three pine trees alluding to one of the District's main amenities, the Gortin Glen Forest Park. These are enclosed within a circlet of white stars from the American flag alluding to the Ulster-American Folk Park in the District, which commemorates the Mellon family and the close links between the Irish and American peoples.
The supporters combine the red lion, sword and severed hand which are prominent in the heraldry of the O'Neills of Tyrone. The lions have a distinctive collar of gold 'Os' for Omagh and O'Neill.
The badge takes the river motif and green background (for the rural areas) and the gold castle (for Omagh) from the shield, set within a gold circle giving the letter 'O'.
The motto is the ancient Irish form of Omagh — Oigh Maigh. .


back to contents page
back to front page
back to index page