EAST MIDLANDS REGION

DERBYSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Or a Rose Gules surmounted by another Argent both barbed and seeded proper on a Chief Sable three Stags' Heads caboshed of the third.
*CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Or a Dragon wings elevated Sable holding in the dexter claw a Pick Or and collared Argent.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Stag and on the sinister side a Ram both proper each gorged with a Chain Or pendent therefrom a Rose Gules surmounted by another Argent both barbed and seeded proper.

Motto 'BENE CONSULENDO' - By good counsel.
Arms granted 17th September 1937. Arms re-granted and crest and supporters granted 1975.

derbyshire cc arms

The Tudor rose has been an emblem of the County for many years, having appeared on an unofficial device which preceded the the grant of arms. The stags' heads are from the Cavendish arms of the Duke of Devonshire.
The dragon crest, with metal collar and pick, symbolises the county's foundation by Danes, men of dragon ships, and the county's mining and engineering enterprise. Dragons traditionally amass underground and guard great mineral wealth.
The stag and ram have special significance for Derbyshire. Deer are closely associated with the county, founded by Danish invaders of the ninth century, who named their first fort, Derby, for the wild deer that were so abundant in the area. Sheep were introduced in the New Stone Age. They were the foundation of local farming, and later provided raw materials of early cloth and leather industry on which the county's towns were based. The ram is also the county's regimental mascot.


LEICESTERSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Quarterly per fesse indented Argent and Gules in the first quarter a Torteau charged with a Cinquefoil Ermine in the second quarter a Lion rampant double queued also Argent in the third quarter an Ostrich Feather Ermine in the fourth quarter a Maunch Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Fox courant over Stubble proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Bull Sable ducally gorged Or and on the sinister side a Leicestershire Ram proper.

Motto 'FOR'ARD FOR'ARD'.
Granted 25th January 1930.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

leicestershire cc arms

The arms incorporate elements from the heraldry of four important County families, three of whom became Earls of Leicester.
The ermine cinquefoil is that of the Beaumont family, in 1103 Robert de Beaumont was made the first Earl of Leicester. The Earldom eventually passed through the sister of the fourth Earl (FitzParnel) to her husband Simon de Montfort (1206-1264), from whose arms the white doubled tailed lion on red is taken. Simon also held the Honour of Hinckley, to which appertained arms consisting of a shield parted palewise indented silver and red, from which is derived the fessewise indentation in these arms. The ermine plume is the badge of John of Gaunt (another Earl of Leicester) and the black sleeve is the badge of the Hastings family, who built castles at Kirby Muxloe and Ashby-de-la-Zouch.
The running fox refers to fox hunting, which first originated in an organised form in Leicestershire in the 1690's.
The bull and ram symbolise the County's original major industries, grazing and wool. The bull's coronet represents the link with the Duchy of Lancaster, several Earls of Leicester were also Dukes of Lancaster.
The motto again refers to fox hunting, it is placed between a hazel leaf and a red martlet, which refer to Lord Hazlerigg, Lord-Lieutenant of Leicestershire from 1925 to 1949 and Lieutenant Colnel Sir Robert Martin, Chairman of the County Council from 1924 to 1960.


LINCOLNSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert a Bend wavy Argent charged with a like Bendlet Azure overall a Bend sinister Ermine between four Fleurs-de-Lys Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert a Lapwing proper between two Ostrich Feathers Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On either side an Officer of the 10th Foot (Lincolnshire "Yellowbellies") circa 1795 holding in his dexter hand a drawn Sword point downwards all proper.

Granted 8 April 1977.
Motto 'IN UNITY WE SERVE'

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

lincolnshire cc arms

The silver and blue wavy band indicates the coast line and the inland waterways network of the County and the ermine band symbolises Ermine Street, the Roman road which serves the length of the County. The four gold fleur-de-lys are taken from the arms of the City of Lincoln.
The Lapwing indicates the natural fauna of the County between two silver feathers recording the confirmation by Charter of the granting by Eaward I of the title of Prince of Wales to his son on 7 February 1301 at Nettleham, near Lincoln.
The supporters are Officers of the 10th Regiment of Foot - the Lincolnshire "Yellowbellies" (now incorporated in the Royal Anglian Regiment) - with drawn swords and in the uniform of 1795.


NORTHAMPTONSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper on a Chief of the second a Fetterlock Or between two Roses of the first barbed and seeded also proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Falcon close Argent gorged with a Cord tied Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Hart Argent gorged with an Iron Collar and Chain reflexed over the back proper on the sinister side a Bull guardant Sable gorged with a Collar and Line reflexed over the back Or.

Motto 'ROSA CONCORDIA SIGNUM' - The rose, emblem of harmony.
Granted 1st August 1939.

northants cc arms

A rose has long been the emblem of Northamptonshire, having appeared on a seal used by the magistrates in Quarter Sessions as far back as 1665. The fetterlock and roses recall Northamptonshire's associations with the houses of York and Lancaster, whose rivalry culminated in the Wars of the Roses, and whose ultimate union was symbolized by the Tudor rose.
The silver falcon is derived from the heraldry of Edward III and his great great great great grandson Edward IV, who was linked to the county through his marriage at Grafton Regis to Elizabeth Woodville, a member of an ancient North­amptonshire family which supported the Lancastrian cause, and which is represented in the arms by the red rose. The white roses, the falcon, and the fetterlock are all Yorkist badges.
The black bull and the white hart are taken from the heraldry of the Yorkist Kings, and also refer to the county’s leather and shoe-making industries. The white hart also represents the ancient royal forests of Rockingham, Salcey and Whittlebury and its metal collar the steel industry.
This motto refers to the Tudor rose a combination of the white Yorkist and red Lancastrian roses.


NOTTINGHAMSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert a Fesse wavy per fesse wavy Argent and Azure over all an Oak Tree fructed Or.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown a Garb Or charged with the Blade of a Miner's Shovel Sable.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion rampant queue fourchee Sable gorged with a Saxon Crown Or and on the sinister side a Greyhound Argent gorged with a like Crown with line reflexed over the back Azure.

Motto 'SAPIENTER PROFICIENS' - Progress with wisdom.
Granted 19th July 1937.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

nottinghamshire cc arms

The green background represents the extensive verdure of the County and the blue and white waves the River Trent, which flows through the southern and eastern parts of the County. The golden oak tree bearing acorns recalls the ancient Queen or Major Oak (reputed to be the largest in England) in the Royal Forest of Sherwood, which in olden times extended over a large part of the western half of the County and was the traditional haunt of the legendary Robin Hood.
The mural crown is a common symbol of civic government and the sheaf of corn and the miner's shovel blade represent agriculture and coal mining respectively - these being the major industries of the County.
The black lion with double tail is from the heraldry of the Dukes of Portland and the white greyhound from that of the Dukes of Newcastle and commemorate the fact that a member of one or other of these ducal families has for generations most frequently held the Office of Lord Lieutenant of the County. The Saxon Crowns are indicative of ancient Royal connections with Nottinghamshire.


AMBER VALLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL (DERBYSHIRE)

*ARMS: Vert a Pale wavy Or a Bordure Argent charged with five Horseshoes Sable on a Chief of the second between two Lozenges a Cresset Sable fired proper.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours the Battlements of a Tower proper issuant therefrom between two Abbatical Crosiers Or an Oak Tree proper fructed and ensigned by a Crown of Fleurs-de-Lys Gold.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Unicorn Argent armed and crined Or gorged with a Collar pendent therefrom a Cross flory Gules and on the sinister side a Leopard proper gorged with a Collar Gules pendent therefrom a Fleur-de-Lys Or.

Motto 'PER LABOREM PROGREDIMUR' - We make progress through hard work.
Granted 18th October 1989.

The Borough of Amber Valley was formed by the amalgamation of the Alfreton Urban District, the Belper Urban District, the Heanor Urban District, the Ripley Urban District and the Belper Rural District.

amber valley bc arms

The gold wave on the green background represents the River Amber in its valley within a white border, like the arms of the Ripley UDC, charged with five of the six horseshoes from the arms of the de Ferrers family, founders of Darley Abbey which bore the Ferrers arms and owned much of the present borough area. The two black diamonds and flaming cresset or fire-basket, like those in the arms of Alfreton UDC, indicate the coal and iron mining industries so important in the development of the area.
The tower battlements, like that in the crest of Belper RDC, refers to Codnor and other local castles and strongholds. The oak tree recalls Duffield Forest, with gold acorns an allusion also to the Oakes family prominent in Alfreton's industrial history. The tree is topped by an ancient crown of fleurs-de-lys similar to that of Henry III who often hunted in the 'Frith' Forest and had numerous possessions therein. The two gold abbatial crosiers are for Darley and Beauchief Abbeys. The mantling also refers to Heanor's textile Industry.
The unicorn is derived from the unicorn's head in the crest of Ripley. This in turn is from the crest of the Wright family, used by the Butterley Company of which John Wright was a co-founder in 1790. It wears the red collar from the neck of the popinjays or parrots of the Curzons of Kedleston; hanging from this is a red 'cross flory' from the arms of the Outrams of Butterley, co-founders of the Butterley engineering firm. The leopard is one of the supporters of the arms of the Strutts. Jedediah Strutt was the founder of the textile industry of Belper, from which Edward, his grandson, took his title as the tirst Baron Belper. The leopard also wears the Curzon collar, from which depends a gold fleur-de-lys from the arms of John of Gaunt, used by the former Belper UDC. He had a residence and hunting-lodge at Belper. The fleur-de-lys is also an emblem of St.Mary, patron saint of Crich. The whole stands on a grassy base divided by blue and white waves representing the River Derwent and other rivers in the district.
The motto is one used by the former Heanor UDC.


BLABY DISTRICT COUNCIL (LEICESTERSHIRE)

ARMS: Per fesse indented Vert and Sable a Saltire Or charged with a Saltire Purpure on a Chief Ermine a Maunche of the second between two Legs embowed each hosed and shod with a Soft Leather Shoe of the fifteenth century couped also Purpure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours, set upon a representation of the Entrance to the Railway Tunnel at Glenfield in the District of Blaby proper a Saltire perched thereon an Eagle displayed wings extended fessewise Or.

Motto 'IN TERRA DIVITIAE'-In the earth, riches.
Granted 20th December 1954 to the Blaby RDC, transferred by Order of the Privy Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

blaby dc arms

The green and black divisions of the field represent the green fields of agriculture and the black rich earth. The black points may be taken to represent the stone quarrying industry and the granite outcropping at several points in the District. They can also allude to the original ridge and furrow treatment of the land for natural drainage. The gold saltire is from the arms attributed to the ancient Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Mercia, and refers to the many remains found in the District from that era. The purple saltire represents the two great Roman roads, Fosse Way running from the South West to the North East and Watling Street, running from the South East to the North West, which cross the District at High Cross. Purple is the colour of Imperial Rome. The ermine chief is from the arms of Ralph, Lord Bassett (1368-1390), one of the founder Knights of the Garter, who had a castle at Sapcote. The black maunche or sleeve is from the heraldry of the Hastings family. William, Lord Hastings (1430-1485) built Kirby Muxloe Castle, which is now an ancient monument. The shoed legs refer to the two main industries of the area, hosiery and knitwear, and boot and shoe manufacture.
The tower represents the tunnel and ventilating tower at Glenfield, built in 1832 by Robert Stephenson for the Leicester-Swannington Railway. The golden eagle, from the head of a centurion's standard upon the purple cross is a further reference to High Cross, where the Roman Station of Venonae formerly stood.


BOSTON BOROUGH COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Or on a Chevron Azure three Coronets each composed of Crosses Paty and Fleurs-de-Lys Or on a Chief Sable a Garb between two Pairs of Windmill Sails also Or.
CREST On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Lion Or holding between the forepaws a Woolsack proper charged with a Ram couchant Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Mermaid proper crined and finned Or upon a Compartment of Waves barry wavy Azure and Argent.

Motto 'SERVE WITH AMNITY'.
Granted 1974?.

The Borough of Boston was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Boston and the Boston Rural District.

boston bc arms

The three princes coronets were transferred from the arms of the former Borough of Boston, their origin is not definately know, but it is said they represent the Dukes of Brittany, Richmond and Suffolk. The gold field and wheatsheaf represent the arable fenland and the windmill sails, like those in the arms of the Boston RDC, refer to the characteristic Dutch-type drainage of the area.
The woolpack and ram are an indication that Boston was a staple town for wool. The lion relates to King John and alludes to his journey to Swineshead after losing his treasure in the Wash.
The two mermaids are also derived from the supporters of the former Borough, and emphasise Boston's importance as a port both in medieval times and the present day. Tradition has it the two mermaids signify the connection between the Borough and two women of note in the reign of Henry VIII, namely Anne Boleyn and Princess Mary, Duchess of Suffolk. Anne Boleyn was related to the Tilney family, who held lands in Boston from the 13th to 15th centuries. The Duke of Suffolk, husband of Princess Mary, was the brother-in-law of Henry VIII and was granted land in Boston by him.


BROXTOWE BOROUGH COUNCIL (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Argent three Barrulets wavy Azure overall a lozenge lozengy Argent and Sable between in chief two Bees volant in bend and in base three Bears segant erect two and one proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours within a Circlet composed alternately of Bezants fimbriated Sable and Torteaux a Brock passant proper.

Granted ?

The Borough of Broxtowe was formed by the amalgamation of the Beeston and Stapleford Urban District, the Eastwood Urban District and part of the Basford Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

broxtowe bc arms

The black and white lozenge, indicating coal-mining in the area, is adapted from the arms of the Eastwood UDC and the three bears from the arms of the Basford family, formed part of the seal of the Basford RDC. The two honey-bees and the wavy bands, from the arms of the Beeston and Stapleford UDC, indicate the industrious characteristic of the Borough and its river frontage.
The gold and black and red roundels are also from the Eastwood arms and the badger or brock, in typical heraldic allusive fashion, refers to the name of the Borough.


CHESTERFIELD BOROUGH COUNCIL (DERBYSHIRE)

ARMS: Gules a Device representing a Pomegranate Tree as depicted on the ancient Common Seal of the Borough the tree leaved and eradicated proper flowered and fructed Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Mural Crown Gules masoned Or a Mount Vert thereon a Derby Ram passant guardant proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Cock and on the sinister side a Pynot or Magpie proper each ducally crowned Or.

Motto 'ASPIRE'.
Granted 10th November 1955.

chesterfield bc arms

The arms are derived from the design of the Borough's Common Seal, which bears a pomegranate tree decoratively treated. This emblem was in use by Chesterfield in the reign of Elizabeth I, and may have been derived from the pomegranate of Granada which Henry VIII had adopted as a badge on his marriage with Katherine of Aragon. It has however been claimed that the pomegranate was in use by Chesterfield long before Tudor times. For some unknown reason in the 17th century the pomegranate was discarded in favour of arms - Gules on a gold fess a lozenge azure - but the pomegranate was restored to the Seal in 1893.
The mural crown is a common symbol of civic government and the ram links the arms with the County.
The supporters each with a ducal crown commemorate the Revolution plot of 1688 at the Cock and Pynot Inn (now the Revolution House) at Old Whittington and the association of the Earl of Devonshire and other with that plot. The supporters are depicted on a base representing the rocks and moorland around the Town. The motto is both encouraging and refers to the famous "crooked spire" of the Parish Church.


CORBY BOROUGH COUNCIL (NORTHAMPTONSHIRE)

ARMS: Gules a Cross patonce cantoning four Oak Leaves each enfiled by a Ducal Coronet Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Corbie wings elevated Sable beaked membered gorged with a Ducal Coronet and chained Or its dexter claw resting on a Gad of Steel proper.

Motto 'DEEDS NOT WORDS'.
Granted 3rd March 1958, to the Corby Urban District Council.

The Borough of Corby formed by the amalgamation of the Corby Urban District and part of the Kettering Rural District.

corby bc arms

The red background and gold cross are from the arms of the Latimer Family, former Lords of the Manor. The four crowns in each quarter indicate that Corby is of ancient demesne, as shown in the Doomsday Book and that it was a Royal Manor before and after the Norman Conquest. Threaded through the crowns are four oak leaves, indicating the location of the town in the Royal Forest of Rockingham.
The wreath and mantling are in the basic red and gold of the shield, whilst the a raven or corbie, is symbolic of the name Corby. The gold collar and chain distinguish it from other raven crests. The wings of the raven are extended and in one claw it holds a gad or block of steel, indicating the major industry that was once the mainstay of the town.
The motto indicates Corby's attitude to social responsibility.


DERBY CITY COUNCIL (UA)

ARMS: Argent on a Mount Vert within Park Palings a Buck lodged between two Oak Trees fructed proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Ram passant proper collared Or between two Sprigs of Broom also proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Buck charged on the shoulder with a Sprig of Broom proper.

Motto 'INDUSTRIA VIRTUS ET FORTITUDO' - Diligence, courage and strength.
Granted 12th May 1939.

derby city arms

The stag at rest amid palings, known locally as 'the buck in the park', has been a badge of the City from time immemorial, and may have been derived from the white hart badge of Richard II. The ram and stag are traditionally associated with the County and the broom plant is a badge of the Plantagenet kings from whom Derby received its early charters.


EREWASH BOROUGH COUNCIL (DERBYSHIRE)

ARMS: Argent three Bends wavy Azure overall between three Astronomical Signs of Mars Or a Chevron Gules thereon a Fleur de Lys also Or on a Chief dovetailed Gules a Garb of Wheat between two Hanks of Cotton Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or Gules and Azure out of a Mural Crown Or masoned Gules charged with four Annulets Sable and between two Torches issuing Azure enflamed proper a Stag rampant Gules and gorged with Lace proper attired and unguled Gold.
BADGE: A Stag's Head caboshed Gules attired Or in the mouth an Astronomical Sign of Mars Or and between the attires a Rose Gules barbed proper thereon another Argent barbed and seeded also proper.

Motto 'PER SAPIENTIAM CONSTANTIAMQUE VICTORIA' - Triumph through wisdom and endeavour.
Granted 1983.

The Borough of Erewash was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Ilkeston, the Long Eaton Urban District and part of the South East Derbyshire Rural District.

erewash bc arms
erewash badge
Badge

The three wavy blue bands symbolise the three rivers - Trent, Derwent and Erewash. The chevron was common to the arms of Long Eaton UDC and South East Derbyshire RDC and the fleur-de-lys, emblem of St. Mary, recalls St.Mary's Abbey. The signs of Mars, prominent in the arms of the Borough of Ilkeston, represent the iron and steel industry at Stanton Ironworks and the heavy engineering aspects of the Borough. The hanks of yarn symbolise the past and present textile manufacturing trades and the wheatsheaf represents the different parishes in the Borough. The dovetailed edge of the chief symbolises the woodworking and furniture making industries.
The mural crown is a frequent symbol of civic government and the black annulets or rings, from the South East Derbyshire arms, symbolise steel-making and engineering. The torches, like that in the crest of Long Eaton, represents industry and the stag commmon to the arms of both Nottingham and Derby indicates the general geographical location of Erewash. The stag's lace collar, again common to the arms of Ilkeston and Long Eaton, represents the lace-making industry.


GEDLING BOROUGH COUNCIL (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE)

*ARMS: Azure an Oak Tree fructed and eradicated Or on a Chief lozengy Argent and Sable tree Garbs of the second.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Mural Crown Or in front of two Arrows in saltire points downwards a Torch Sable enflamed proper.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Stag and on the sinister side a Bear both proper.

Motto 'OMNIBUS OPTIMUM' - The best for all.
Granted ?

The Borough of Gedling was formed by the amalgamation of the Arnold Urban District, the Carlton Urban District and part of the Basford Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

gedling bc arms

The Oak Tree alludes to that in the arms of the County Council and to Sherwood Forest. The 'chief' of a pattern of black diamonds refers to the coal mining industry and the wheatsheaves to farming.
The mural crown signifies Gedling's Borough status while the torch symbolises industry. The arrows which appeared in the arms of the Arnold UDC allude again to the Sherwood connection.
The stag features as a supporter in the arms of the City of Nottingham and the bear is taken from the device of three bears formerly used by the Basford RDC.


HIGH PEAK BOROUGH COUNCIL (DERBYSHIRE)

ARMS: Sable three Piles Or on a Base enarched Vert fimbrated Or a Fountain.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert a Piece of Blue John Stone proper within a Chevron Sable.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Stag Or attired and unguled Sable gorged with a Mural Crown Vert and resting the interior hind leg on a Piece of Blue John Stone proper.
BADGE: A Fountain within a Triangle Sable.

Motto 'CONSILIO SEMPER PUBLICO' - Ever in the public interest.
Granted 1976.

The Borough of High Peak was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Buxton, the Borough of Glossop, the New Mills Urban District, the Whaley Bridge Urban District, the Chapel-en-le-Frith Rural District and the Tintwistle Rural District.

high peak bc arms
high peak badge
Badge

The black points, similar to those in the arms of the Chapel-en-le-Frith RDC, represent the high peaks in the north of the district and the green base symbolises the green lowlands. The heraldic fountain refers to the lakes, reservoirs and natural mineral springs.
The chevron continues the peak motif of the arms, but here it is a single peak at the highest point of the achievement of arms, being a specific reference to the name of the Borough. The piece of Blue John is shown as if in a cave and recalls the mineral, which is a special feature of the district and known worldwide.
The stag or buck is found in the heraldry of the entire district. The stags represent the Cavendish stag, the stag of Downs, Lords of the Manor of Whaley Bridge, the buck seen in the crest of the Borough of Buxton and the stags that once roamed over the whole area.


HINCKLEY AND BOSWORTH BOROUGH COUNCIL (LEICESTERSHIRE)

ARMS: Per pale indented Argent and Gules on a Chief Or three Torteaux that in the centre charged with a Pierced Cinquefoil Ermine the others each charged with a Mascle Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Dragon Gules preying on a Boar passant Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Ram reguardant Sable armed Or.

Motto 'POST PROELIA CONCORDIA'-After the battle, concord.
Granted 15th November 1974.

The Borough of Hinckley and Bosworth was formed by the amalgamation of the Hinckley Urban District and the Market Bosworth Rural District, except for the Parish of Ibstock.

hinkley and bosworth bc arms

The zigzag division of the shield into silver and red, as in the arms of the Hinckley UDC, represents the banner of Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, thought to have been borne by later Earls of Leicester in connection with their Honour of Hinckley. The gold chief comes from the arms of the Dixie family of Market Bosworth. The red roundels are from the arms of the de Grey family, the gold mascles from those of the Ferrers and the ermine cinquefoil from those of Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Leicester. All these families were prominent in the neighbourhood.
The crest refers to the Battle of Bosworth Field, symbolising the defeat of the white boar (Richard III) by the red dragon (Henry VII). The white boar featured in the crest of the Market Bosworth RDC.
The black rams, suggested by the crest of the Hinckley UDC, commemorate the woollen industry upon which Hinckley's staple trade of hosiery manufacture was originally founded. The sheep's skin can also be taken as a reference to the important local industry of boot and shoe manufacture. The motto is that previously used by the Market Bosworth RDC.


KETTERING BOROUGH COUNCIL (NORTHAMPTONSHIRE)

*ARMS: Sable on a Fess Argent between in chief a Garb Or between two Annulets embattled on the outer edge Argent and in base a Pelt Or five Lozenges conjoined Gules.
*CREST: On a Wreath Or and Sable a representation of the Geddington Queen Eleanor Memorial Cross proper between two Fountains each charged with a Martlet Sable.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a female Figure richly attired in antique Habit Azure and upon her head a Plume of three Ostrich Feathers Argent and on the sinister side a Negro proper habited about the waist with a Cloth and his sinister wrist encircled with a Handcuff pendent therefrom a broken Chain Azure.

Motto 'PROGRESSIO ET CONCORDIA' - Progress and concord.
Granted .

The Borough of Kettering was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Kettering, the Burton Latimer Urban District, the Desborough Urban District, the Rothwell Urban District and part of the Kettering Rural District.

kettering bc arms

The five red conjoined diamonds refer to the five former local authorities, whose areas were united in 1974 to form the current Borough. The diamonds derive from the arms of the Montagus of Boughton in whom part of the Manor of Kettering was vested. The gold pelt, like that in the arms of the former Borough of Kettering, the sheaf of wheat and the two silver cogwheels, refer to the marriage of the urban and rural areas of the Borough and represent the leather used in the footwear industry and its allied trades, agriculture and food production, which with engineering are the three main historical activities in the Borough.
The crest depicts Geddington Cross which is an outstanding historical monument in the Borough, and one of the three remaining Crosses erected by King Edward I at each place where the body of his wife Queen Eleanor of Castile rested overnight on its journey from Lincolnshire to Westminster Abbey in 1294. The heraldic fountains at both sides of the base of the Cross symbolises the formation of the Baptist Missionary Society at the Mission House in Lower Street, Kettering, in 1792. The black martlets taken from the arms of the Watsons of Rockingham recognising the vesting of the remaining part of the Manor of Kettering in the Watson family. Both the fountains and martlets appeared in the arms of the former Borough.
The female figure is taken from the arms of the Dukes of Buccleuch and Queensberry, who descend from the Montagu family and the male figure with a broken chain, as in the arms of the former Borough, symbolises the pioneer and triumphant work of William Knibb in the cause of the freedom of slaves. Knibb was born in Market Street, Kettering in 1803.


LEICESTER CITY COUNCIL (UA)

ARMS: Gules a Cinquefoil pierced Ermine.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Wyvern sans legs Argent strewed with Wounds Gules wings expanded Ermine.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion reguardant Gules gorged with a Ducal Coronet suspended therefrom by a Chain Or a Cinquefoil Ermine pierced Gules.

Motto 'SEMPER AEDEM' - Always the same.
Arms and crest granted at the Visitation of 1619. Supporters granted 2nd December 1926.

leicester city arms

The Cinquefoil was the device adopted by Robert De Bellomonte, first Earl of Leicester, and used by Robert Fitz Parnell, one of his successors who died in 1204.
The wyvern was the crest of Thomas of Lancaster, second Lancastrian Earl of Leicester. It has sometimes been quoted as all ermine. The Dukes of Lancaster from Edmund Crouchback onwards inherited the Earldom of Leicester and held lands in the city – hence the Lancastrian connection.
Following recognition by Royal Charter in 1919 of Leicester’s City Status, an application was made in 1926 for a design to include supporters and the College of Arms produced one with the red Lancastrian lion on either side.


LINCOLN CITY COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent on a Cross Gules a Fleur-de-Lis Or.

Motto 'CIVITAS LINCOLNIA or FLOREAT LINDUM'.
Recorded at the College of Arms.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

lincoln city arms

The red cross on white is that of St. George, white being the symbol of purity, justice and gentleness, while the red is thought to symbolise valour. The fleur-de-lis represents the Virgin Mary, the patron saint of both the Cathedral and the City.
The arms are sometimes shown with the above mottos, Lindum being the Roman name for the City.


MANSFIELD DISTRICT COUNCIL (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Quarterly Or and Azure in dexter chief and in sinister chief a Roman Helmet proper lined Gules and in base the Attires of a Stag conjoined at their burrs proper over all a Cross flory per cross counterchanged of the Field.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure on a Mount Vert an Oak Tree proper between two Lions rampant combatant Or armed and langued Gules the dexter lion supporting by its sinister paw a Pickaxe passing behind the tree in bend the Haft Or the sinister lion supporting by its sinister paw a Pickaxe passing in front of the tree in bend sinister its Haft also Or and the blades of both sable resting upon the ground; Mantled Azure doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Stag per fesse Verte and Or semée of Oak Leaves counterchanged attired and unguled Gold langued Gules and gorged with a Duke's Coronet Or and on the sinister side a Lion per fesse Verte and Or semée of Oak Leaves counterchanged armed and langued Gules and gorged with a Duke's Coronet Gold.
BADGE: The Attires of a Stag conjoined at their burrs proper braced at their beams with a Cross flory per cross Azure and Or.

Motto 'SICUT QUERCUS VIRESCIT INDUSTRIA' - Industry flourishes like the oak.
Granted 10th June 1987

The Mansfield District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Mansfield, the Mansfield Woodhouse Urban District and the Warsop Urban District.

mansfield dc arms

The quartered field and cross flory are derived from the arms of the Borough of Mansfield and the two Roman helmets are from the device used by the Mansfield Woodhouse UDC. The pair of antlers allude to the deer in Sherwood Forest.
The crest incorporates a Sherwood Forest oak tree, like the crest used by the Borough of Mansfield, except that the small crosses have been replaced by pickaxes associated with the mining industry. The two lions are derived from the device of the Warsop UDC.
The dexter supporter is a Sherwood Forest stag with distinctive colouring patterned with oak leaves from the same forest and the sinister supporter is a lion. Both are gorged with a golden crown fashioned in the manner of a Duke's Coronet, alluding to the unofficial term "Dukeries" associated with the area.
The motto repeats that of the Borough of Mansfield.


MELTON BOROUGH COUNCIL (LEICESTERSHIRE)

*ARMS: Quarterly Gules and Vert in the first and fourth quarters a Tower and in the second and third quarters a Garb Or over all a Lion rampant Argent.
*CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules a Lion rampant quarterly Argent and Gules holding in the dexter claw a Latin Cross Or and in the sinister claw a Roll of Parchment proper.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Bull Sable armed Or and gorged with a Collar dancetty of two points upward Argent and on the sinister side a Horse Argent gorged with a like Collar Gules each resting the interior hoof on a Tower Or, the whole upon a grassy Compartment divided per pale by furrows.

Motto 'UNITY WITH DIVERSITY'.
Granted 17th December 1986.

The Borough of Melton was formed by the amalgamation of the Melton Mowbray Urban District and the Melton and Belvoir Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

melton bc arms

The white lion is from the arms of the Mowbray family, Lords of Melton for over 300 years, whose arms (a white lion rampant on a red field) was used without authority by the former Melton Mowbray UDC. The towers on red allude to the district's borough status and the ancient castles of Belvoir, Melton Mowbray and Thorpe Arnold. The wheat sheaves on green refer to agriculture.
The lion in the crest bears the Mowbray colours of white and red. The gold cross symbolises the district's ecclesiastical heritage - fine parish churches of Melton and Bottesford and the medieval importance of Croxton Abbey, Belvoir Priory and Burton Lazars Leper Hospital. The scroll refers to the indentures associated with Melton Town Estate and to the Borough Charter.
The black bull is similar to that of the Leicestershire County Council and alludes to Melton Cattle Market. The white horse refers to field sports and farming. Their collars form the letter M, and the compartment conveys the Borough's town and country aspects.


NORTHAMPTON BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules on a Mount Vert a Tower triple-towered Argent the portcullis raised Or supported by two Lions rampant guardant of the last.

Motto 'CASTELLO FORTIOR CONCORDIA' - Peace is stronger than a fortress.
Recorded at the Visitation of 1617.

northampton bc arms

The castle doubtless refers to Northampton Castle, which was built by Simon de Senlis around 1100, and was on several occasions the scene of Councils and Parliaments. A castle had appeared on various Borough seals over the years and the English lions are royal emblems.


NORTH EAST DERBYSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Or a Miner's Pick Sable surmounted of a Tudor Rose barbed and seeded proper on a Bordeure engrailed also Sable eight Annulets Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert out of a Mural Crown Argent masoned Sable a representation of the crooked spire of Chesterfield Parish Church proper.

Motto 'REGNANT QUI SERVIUNT' - They rule who serve.
Granted 20th September 1954, to the Chesterfield Rural District Council.

The North East Derbyshire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Clay Cross Urban District, the Dronfield Urban District and a majority of the Chesterfield Rural District.

north east derbyshire dc arms

The Tudor rose is derived from the arms of the County Council and the miner's pick and black border represent the mining industry. The gold rings and engrailed edging of the border are from the arms of the former Earls of Scarsdale and recall the ancient Hundred of Scarsdale.
The gold and green of the wreath represent a rural area and its agriculture. The mural crown is a common civic emblem and the crooked spire of Chesterfield Parish Church, refers the Town that gave its name to the Rural District.


NORTH KESTEVEN DISTRICT COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Per chevron Vert and Sable on a Chevron Or between in chief two Bars wavy the nether issuant Argent surmounted of a demi Eagle issuant displayed wings inverted Or and in base an Oak Tree issuant fructed Or three Estoiles Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Vert out of the Battlements of a Tower a Crane wings expanded and inverted proper supporting with the interior foot a Maltese Cross resting upon the battlements quarterly Gules and Argent.

Motto 'RECTAM VIAM SEQUI'
-To follow the right road.
Granted ?.

The North Kesteven District was formed by the amalgamation of the Sleaford Urban District, the East Kesteven Rural District and the North Kesteven Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

north kesteven dc arms

The green background, two white waves, and the top half of the golden eagle in the upper portion of the shield are from the arms of the North Kesteven RDC from which the present District takes its name. The waves denote the rivers Witham and Brant in the agricultural countryside. The eagle refers to the numerous Roman associations of the area - the Fosse Way, Fosse Dyke and Ermine Street, which for part of its length formed the common boundary of North and East Kesteven. The lower part of the shield is taken from the arms of the East Kesteven RDC - a gold oak tree ultimately taken from the arms of the Kesteven County Council, representing the forests, remnants of which still survive in the south of the old county. The gold chevron with three black stars from the arms of the Sleaford UDC, which are taken from those of the distinguished Carre family. The three stars also indicate the union of the three former authorities in one edifice, suggested by the gable-end shape of the chevron.
The wreath is in green and white - the liveries of Kesteven County Council. The crane from the East Kesteven crest represents the important R.A.F. College at Cranwell (also commemorated in the Sleaford crest by an eagle). The crane stands within the battlements of a tower alluding to Somerton Castle, a 13th century residence of the Bishops of Lincoln, and rests a claw on a cross combining the red Maltese Cross of the Knights Templars and the white cross of the Knights Hospitallers, who had establishments at Mere in the North, Temple Bruer in the East and Eagle in the North. The crest thus combines influential institutions in the life of the area in both ancient and modern times.
The motto is that of the previous North Kesteven Rural District Council, a quotation from Cicero. It may be translated 'To follow the right road' and also 'To follow the straight road', the latter giving a reference to the Roman roads of the area.


NORTH WEST LEICESTERSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per chevron Argent and Sable in chief two Ash Trees couped and in base on a Granite Rock issuant proper a Castle of three towers Argent on a Chief Vert between two Garbs a Mitre affrontée Or charged with two Crosses formy Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent Sable and Vert, within a Circlet of six Lozenges conjoined Sable Flames proper issuant therefrom a demi-Lion Or gorged with a Collar Gules bezanty and holding a Hexagon Argent charged with a Maunch Sable.

Motto 'EX TERRA OPES'-From the earth wealth.
Granted 30th October 1974.

The North West Leicestershire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Ashby de la Zouch Urban District, the Ashby Wolds Urban District, the Coalville Urban District, the Ashby de la Zouch Rural District, the Castle Donnington Rural District and the Parish of Ibstock from the Market Bosworth Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

north west leicestershire dc arms

The green, white and black background suggests agriculture and coal mining. The two sheaves, like those in the arms of Coalville UDC and Ashby de la Zouch RDC, emphasise further the agriculture of the rural areas. The gold mitre with two red crosses is from the arms of Archbishop Laud, an historical reference to Ibstock with which he was associated. The two ash trees refer to the Ashby districts. The white castle was common to the arms of Ashby de la Zouch UDC and Castle Donnington RDC, the rock upon which it stands suggests Charnwood ("rock forest").
The black diamonds, like those in the crest of Coalville UDC, refer to coal mining and the flames to the fire-clay working and brick-making industries. The gold lion, also from the Coalville crest, is that of the Beaumont family and its collar is formed by the gold roundels on red of the Lords Zouch, seen in the arms of Ashby de la Zouch RDC. The black maunch or sleeve, common to the arms of Coalville UDC, Ashby de la Zouch RDC and Castle Donnington RDC, is from the heraldry of the Hastings family. The hexagon suggests the union of six authorities. The motto is that used by the Coalville UDC.


NOTTINGHAM CITY COUNCIL (UA)

ARMS: Gules issuant from the base a ragged Cross couped proper between two Ducal Coronets in chief Or the lower limb of the Cross enfiled with a like Coronet.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Castle walled triple-towered and capped proper the dexter tower surmounted of a Crescent Argent and the sinister tower by an Estoile Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side standing on a Staff raguly erased a Royal Stag guardant proper ducally gorged Or.
BADGE: A Saltire raguly Vert ensigned by a Stag's Head caboshed proper.
STANDARD: Barry of six Or and Argent the Bands Gules edged Gold inscribed Sable fringed Gold and Red.

Motto 'VIVIT POST FUNERA VIRTUS' - Virtue survives death.
Arms recorded at the Visitation of 1614. Crest granted 10th June 1898, Supporters granted 3rd November 1908 (replacing those granted 11th June 1898) and Badge granted 7th November 1911.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

nottingham city arms

The design is similar to the arms of Colchester, but there is no connection between the two places. It is probable that the ragged cross simply refers to the Forest of Sherwood.
The crest is based on the present Seal of the City, which has been in use since the 15th century. In the Seal the crescent moon and the star are shown above the towers and not on them.
The Royal stags and ragged staves are a further reference to Sherwood, they replace earlier supporters - two foresters with longbows - which were considered unsatisfactory.


OADBY AND WIGSTON BOROUGH COUNCIL (LEICESTERSHIRE)

ARMS: Quarterly Gules and Vert on a Bend Or between in the second and third quarters two Bars gemelles Or surmounted of a Pile reversed Argent a Lion's Gamb erased Gules between two pierced Cinquefoils Ermine
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules an Owl affronty supporting with the wings a Brown Pelt charged with a Shuttle erect all proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lamb guardant Argent and on the sinister side a Tiger guardant the tail reflexed upward along the exterior thigh proper.

Motto 'OBTAIN WISDOM'.

The Borough of Oadby and Wigston was formed by the amalgamation of the Oadby Urban District and the Wigston Urban District.

oadby and wigston bc arms

The lion's leg, like that in the arms of the Oadby UDC, represents the Oadby Brabazon and Powys-Keck families. The two cinquefoils are taken from the arms of the Leicestershire County Council. The narrow gold bars symbolise the former railway industry at Wigston and the two white triangles, like those in the arms of the Wigston UDC, recall the town's former name of 'Wigston Two Steeples'.
The owl, the bird of wisdom emphasises the motto. The pelt, as in the crest of the Oadby UDC, refers to the footwear industry and the shuttle, from the crest of the Wigston UDC, represents the hosiery industry.
The lamb suggested by the Oadby crest refers again to woollen and hosiery manufacture, and the tiger from the Wigston crest recalls that town's association with the Royal Leicestershire Regiment.


RUSHCLIFFE BOROUGH COUNCIL (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE)

*ARMS: Per chevron Sable and Vert in chief two Bears salient respectant and in base a representation of the Bingham Butter Cross Or on a Chief Argent a Barrulet wavy Azure rising therefrom a Bridge of three arches Or.
*CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert within a Mural Crown Or charged with three Oak Leaves a Cliff surrounded by Rushes proper.

Motto 'SALUS POPULI' - The welfare of the people.
Granted ?

The Borough of Rushcliffe was formed by the amalgamation of the West Bridgeford Urban District, the Bingham Rural District and part of the Basford Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

rushcliffe bc arms

The black and green background is indicative of coalmining and agriculture. On the black are two of the three gold bears from the arms of the Basford family, contained in the seal of the Basford RDC and on the green is the Butter Cross which was the emblem on the seal of the Bingham RDC. The blue wave is for the River Trent, over which stands a conventionalised Trent Bridge of three arches, for West Bridgford.
The gold mural crown is a familiar civic symbol, charged with three visible oak leaves from the tree in the County arms, denoting three Nottinghamshire communities combined in one authority. The rest of the crest refers to the name Rushcliffe, in typical heraldic allusive fashion, depicted by a cliff rising from rushes.
The Motto is a quotation from Cicero.


RUTLAND COUNTY COUNCIL (UA)

ARMS: Vert semée of Acorns a Horseshoe Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Horseshoe an Acorn Or leaved and slipped proper.

Motto 'MULTUM IN PARVO'-Much in little.
Granted 1st May 1950

On 31st March 1974 the administrive County of Rutland was abolished and the County was administered as part of Leicestershire. The Rutland District Council used the arms of the old County Council. Since 1st April 1998 the County has been administered by the Rutland County Council which is a unitary authority.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

rutland cc arms

The green shield represents the County's agriculture, especially its rich pasture land and the acorn exemplifies the former forest land which at one time covered much of the County, especially on the south side. The horseshoe represents the County's history and hunting association, and recalls the unique collection of horseshoes presented by royalty, peers of the realm, and noblemen passing through the County, which hang on the walls of the famous Castle Hall at Oakham.
The motto bears witness to the efficiency and importance of England's smallest county.


SOUTH DERBYSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL

*ARMS: Vert on a Chevron Or masoned Sable between three garbs Or a like number of Annulets also Sable a Chief vairy Ermine and Gules.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Mount Sable inflamed a Tower Argent rising therefrom Clouds of Steam proper.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion Ermine gorged with a Collar vairy Ermine and Gules and on the sinister side a Wolf Erminois gorged with a Collar quarterly Ermine and Gules each charged on the shoulder with a Rose Gules barbed proper thereon another Argent barbed and seeded also proper.

Motto 'THE EARTH OUR WEALTH'.
Granted ?.

The South Derbyshire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Swadlincote Urban District, the Repton Rural District and part of the South East Derbyshire Rural District.

south derbyshire dc arms

The basic pattern of the shield is that of the South East Derbyshire RDC, a green background with two gold sheaves and a gold chevron with three black rings. These represent agriculture and the iron pipe industry, three rings rather than the original four are shown here for aesthetic reasons and to emphasise the combination of three areas. The gold chevron is masoned with black to suggest the yellow brick industry denoted by the single brick in the Swadlincote UDC crest. The third wheatsheaf represents the former Repton RDC, and this gives the three wheatsheaves of Ranulph de Blunderville, Earl of Chester, whose widow Matilda moved his Priory at Calke to Repton in the late 12th century. The ermine and red chief, like the border of the Swadlincote arms, is from the arms of the Gresley family.
The black mound with flames issuing denotes coalmining and the fireclay industry. The tower, suggested by that of the Stanhope Earls of Harrington in the South East Derbyshire crest. Here it is white and shaped so as to suggest the cooling towers of Drakelow Power Station, with white clouds issuing symbolising steam.
The ermine lion is derived from the Gresley' s crest. He wears adistinctive collar showing one row of the ermine and red pieces from the Gresley arms. The wolf is derived from the supporter of the Stanhope Earls of Harrington, he is of gold with black ermine tails, and wears a collar quartered like the Stanhope's shield in ermine and red. Each beast is charged on the shoulder with a Tudor rose from the County arms.
The motto refers to the coal, fireclay and yellow brick industries and agriculture, all symbolised in the arms.


SOUTH HOLLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Barry wavy of six Azure and Argent in front of two Crosiers in saltire a representation of the Elloe Stone issuant on a Chief Or an open Book proper edged Or bound between two Tulip Heads Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Heron proper supporting with the dexter foot a Cornucopia erect Or replenished with flowers fruit and cereals proper.
BADGE: In front of two Crosiers in saltire a representation of the Elloe Stone Or.

Motto 'PROGRESS THROUGH ENDEAVOUR'.
Granted 1976?.

The South Holland District was formed by the amalgamation of the Spalding Urban District, the East Elloe Rural District and the Spalding Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

south holland dc arms

The background of blue and white waves is like those in the arms of the Spalding RDC and the East Elloe RDC, they represent the waterways of the area. On these lie two crossed crosiers for the monastic foundations of, Castle Acre Priory, Spalding Priory and Crowland Abbey, and the Elloe Stone, also from the East Elloe arms, which marked the site of the Hundred Court of Elloe, the 'local government unit' of mediaeval times which governed most of the South Holland area. The gold chief and book represents the Spalding Gentlemens' Society, a pioneer in local culture, and two tulip heads, all from the arms of the Spalding UDC, the tulips also featured in the arms of the Holland County Council.
The wreath and mantling are in the basic blue and white of the shield. The heron from the arms of the Holland County Council, symbolizes the characteristic local fauna, it supports a gold cornucopia from the Spalding RDC arms, and indicates the flora and rich produce of South Holland.
The motto is that of the Spalding Rural District Council.


SOUTH KESTEVEN DISTRICT COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Checky Or and Azure on a Chevron Vert a Wake Knot between two Garbs Or on a Chief Gules a Lion passant guardant Or.

The South Kesteven District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Grantham, the Borough of Stamford, the Bourne Urban District, the South Kesteven Rural District and the West Kesteven Rural District.

south kesteven dc arms
west kesteven device
Device used by the West Kesteven RDC

The background of gold and blue chequers, common to the arms of the Borough of Stamford and the Borough of Grantham, are from the arms of the great Norman family of de Warenne, who held both manors. The green of the chevron, is like the background of the device of the West Kesteven RDC and the two sheaves of wheat, representing agriculture, are also from this device and the arms of the South Kesteven RDC. The gold knot, the badge of the Wakes, is taken from the arms of the Bourne UDC, of which they were lords in medieval times. At the head of the shield is one of the Royal Lions of England, which formed part of the arms of Stamford.


SOUTH NORTHAMPTONSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure a Lion Rampant within an Orle of Garbs Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of Colours out of a Coronet Or a Cock's Head Gules combed and wattled Or the whole between two Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper.

Motto 'HORA E SEMPRE' - Now and always.
Granted ?

The South Northamptonshire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Brackley, the Brackley Rural District, part of the Northampton Rural District and the Towcester Rural District.

south northamptonshire dc arms

The gold lion is derived from the device used by the Borough of Brackley and the wheat sheaves allude to the Towcester and Northampton Rural Districts, being found in the device of Towcester RDC and the Northampton RDC arms. They also have reference to the Hesketh family.
The crest is based on one of the two armorial bearings of Lord Hesketh to which two roses have been added by way of difference and as a further reference to Northampton Rural District.


WEST LINDSEY DISTRICT COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Vert a Fess Ermine of five Spots between in chief the head of a Roman Legionary Standard between two Garbs of Barley or and in base on Water barry wavy of four Argent and Azure a Viking Ship Or the sail set Argent.
CREST On a Wreath Argent and Vert on a Mount an Oak Tree proper fructed Or bound thereto by a circular Steel Chain proper two Anchors in saltire Or.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lincolnshire Red Shorthorn Bull and on the sinister side a Lincoln Longwool Ram both guardant proper each supporting a Crosier Or.
BADGE: A Pentagon per pale barry wavy of six Argent and Azure and Vert over all a Pallet Ermine of five Spots the Pentagon fimbriated Or.

Motto 'STRIVE FOR THE GAIN OF ALL'.
Granted 15th November 1974.

The West Lindsey District was formed by the amalgamation of the Gainsborough Urban District, the Market Rasen Urban District, the Caistor Rural Dristrict, the Gainsborough Rural District and the Welton Rural District.

west lindesy dc arms

The green background, like that of the Gainsborough UDC and the Caistor RDC, suggests the predominantly rural character of the area. The ermine 'fess' represents, as in the arms of the Gainsborough RDC and the Welton RDC, the Roman Ermine Street. The Roman legionary standard-head in gold is from the arms of the Caistor RDC and emphasizes the Roman associations of that part of Lindsey, this is flanked by two golden sheaves in the same position as in the arms of the Gainsborough UDC and the former Lindsey County Council. The sheaves in the former arms, though not so specified are shown as wheat, while those in the County arms are depicted as barley. The latter is preferred in the new arms as being the more general crop over the whole region, and as having particular reference to the malting industry of Market Rasen. The gold Viking Ship is from the Lindsey arms and the white and blue waves where common to the arms of both the Gainsborough UDC and RDC. Like the dragon ship in the latter's crest, the vessel refers to the Scandinavian incursions into the area by way of the Trent and the settlement under Swein or Sweyn at Gainsborough.
The grassy mound, represents the Lincolnshire Heights and the Wolds. The oak tree with gold acorns, refers to the woodlands, such as Willingham Forest, and particularly the timber park at Brocklesby Woods, where the Earls of Yarborough have established scientific forestry as one of the district's most notable features. The gold crossed anchors from the crest of the Gainsborough UDC, recall the importance to the economic life of the area of the Trent Navigation. The circular steel chain, securing the anchors to the tree are reminder of the allusive 'links' from the Lindsey crest and of the engineering industry of the Gainsborough area.
The Lincolnshire Red Shorthorn bull and the Lincoln Longwool ram, are characteristic Lincolnshire beasts, and represent the dairying activities of the western side of the district and the extensive sheep farming of the middle and eastern parts. The gold crosiers suggests the many historical links of the district with the Bishops of Lincoln, the ancient See of Lindsey, and with Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, half-brother of William the Conqueror and holder of the Manor of Market Rasen in Norman times.


TOWN AND PARISH COUNCILS

ALFORD TOWN COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Barry wavy Argent and Azure a Lion rampant queue fourchee and on a Chief Sable a Windmill Sail of five arms Or between two Lincoln Red Shorthorn Bulls' Heads caboshed proper ringed Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a demi Lion Ermine holding between the paws a Book Or charged with a Rose Gules charged with another Argent barbed and seeded proper seven Mascles conjoined Gules.

Motto 'FOURSQUARE TO ALL WINDS'.
Granted 1st October 1965, to the Alford Urban District Council. Transferred to the Town Council on 16th April 1975.

alford tc arms

The black lion is that of William de Welle, Lord of the Manor of Alford, who obtained the market charter in 1283. The blue and white waves represents the ford that gave Alford its name. The bulls' heads and five armed windmill sail symbolise the importance of agriculture, the town's annual bull fair and its cattle market.
The ermine lion comes from the arms of Lord Burghley, who helped Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School obtain its charter in 1576, and holds, appropriately, a gold book with a Tudor rose on it. The seven red mascles or voided lozenges are traditionally associated with St. Wilfrid, to whom the church is dedicated.
The motto is adapted from Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington by the Lincolnshire poet Alfred Lord Tennyson.


BOURNE TOWN COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Or on a Fess Azure between in chief three Torteaux and in base a Wake Knot Gules a Bar wavy Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from the Battlements of a Tower Gules a demi-Lion Ermine holding between the paws an Escutcheon Azure charged with a Fleur-de-Lys Argent.

Motto 'VIGILA ET ORA'-Watch and Pray.
Granted 23rd July 1953, to the Bourne Urban District Council.

bourne tc arms

The shield is a modification of the arms of the Wakes previously used by the Council. The three red roundels on gold remain, and the characteristic knot, a badge of the Wakes, which surmounted the previous design is now in the base of the shield. The blue and white waves replace the two red bars from the Wake arms, and represent the historic Carr Dyke and the Bourne Eau.
The red battlements represent the Castle and the Ermine lion is from the arms of the Cecils, of which family was Elizabeth I's famous Treasurer Lord Burleigh, and the Marquesses of Exeter who have owned the market rights since 1564. The shield held by the lion, shows the arms of the Digby family of the Red Hall.


BRAUNSTONE TOWN COUNCIL (LEICESTERSHIRE)

*ARMS: Gules on a Fess wavy Azure frimriated Or between in chief a Mauch Argent between two Roundels Or and in base a Cross Formy Argent two Shovellers Argent.
*CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules a Stag statant resting its dexter leg on a Mound of Brown Stones proper.

Motto 'SPECTEMUR AGENDO'- Let us be judged by our actions.
Granted 1976.

braunstone tc arms

The shield contains references to various landowning families connected to Braunstone. The red field derives from the arms of the Peverel, De Grentsmainel, De La Zouch, Herle, De Ferrars, Cantelupe, Slorry, Vaux and Harcourt families. The Shoveller ducks, are from the Herle family who intermarried with the Hastings. The blue fess is from the arms of Burdets the first known family in Braunstone, and also the Grey, Erdington, Camville and Anstey families. The gold roundels are from the arms of de La Zouch who intermarried with the Burdets. The white cross, refers to the families of Peverel, Slorry and Winstanley, the latter family residing in Braunstone from 1651 to 1925. The Sleeve or maunch, refers to the Hastings family who held much land locally from 1367 to 1650. The gold wavy lines, allude to the Drummond Family who held much land to the south east of Braunstone and considerable land in Lubbesthorpe.
The mound of brown stones refers to the name of the town.


EASTWOOD TOWN COUNCIL (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Lozengy Argent and Sable on a Chief Or an Annulet of the second between two Torteaux.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules in front of a Wheel issuing therefrom Argent a rounded Mount Sable lozengy Argent rising therefrom in its Flames a Phoenix proper.

Motto 'WE SEEK THE BEST'.

Arms granted 17th May 1951, to the Eastwood Urban District Council. Crest granted 12th May 1980.

eastwood tc arms

The black diamonds represent coal mining. The annulet is from the hearldry of the Plumtree family and the red roundels are from the arms of the Grey family of Codnor. They may also be seen as representing cricket balls, in allusion to the fact that several well-know cricketers have come from the district.
The flames rising from the black diamonds depict the energy derived from coal, and appearing out of the flames is a Phoenix, the mythical bird which the author D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930) adopted as his emblem. This serves as a reminder that Eastwood was Lawrence's birthplace and his early home. Behind the Phoenix, a railway wheel signifies the Town's role in the development of Britain's railways, for it was at the 'Sun Inn' in 1832 that steps were taken to create the Midland Counties Railway, a major constituent of the Midland Railway.


LOUTH TOWN COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Sable a Wolf rampant Or on a Chief of the last a Plough turned to the sinister Azure between two Garbs Gules.

Motto 'DEO ADJUVANTE NON TIMENDUN'
-With God's assistance there is nothing to fear.
Granted 8th June 1954, to the Louth Borough Council. Transferred by Order in Council 19th May 1976.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

louth tc arms

The golden wolf on a black background was used by the former Borough of Louth, which came into existance in 1836. It is claimed by local historians that it was originally used by Nicholas de Luda in 1351. He was a clerk to Edward II and had a long ecclesiastical career. Luda was the Roman name for Louth. The wheatsheaves and the plough refer to the Town's association with agriculture.


MABLETHORPE AND SUTTON TOWN COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Per fesse embattled Azure and Or in chief two White Lilies slipped and leaved proper the stalks conjoined and entwined with the shank of an Anchor interlaced with the bows of two Keys fessewise wards outwards and downwards Gold and in base three Dolphins naiant of the first.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Argent charged with three Cross Crosslets Sable a demi Lion Gules gorged with a Collar Lozengy of the first and last. Mantled Azure doubled Or.

Motto 'AMOENIORA LITORA NOSTRA'
-Our shores are more delightful.
Granted 10th February 1960, to the Mablethorpe and Sutton Urban District Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

mablethorpe and sutton tc arms

The background colours are appropriate to a seaside resort - blue for the sea and gold for the sands. The embattled line suggests the great sea wall built after the flood disaster of 1953. The top of the shield shows the emblems of three patron saints - lilies for St. Mary the Virgin, keys for St. Peter and an anchor for St. Clement. They are interlaced to represent the union of the parishes of Mablethorpe, Trusthorpe and Sutton-on-Sea. The three dolphins suggest the pleasures of the three resorts
The crest represents the early manorial history of the district. The mural crown is a common civic emblem and bears the crosslets from the arms of the de Mablethorpe family. The red lion is that of the de Montalts, and his collar bears the lozenge pattern of the Fitzwilliams.
The motto is based on a quotation from Tacitus.


NEWARK TOWN COUNCIL (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE)

ARMS: Barry wavy of six Argent and Azure on a Chief Gules a Peacock in his pride proper between a Fleur-de-Lis on the dexter and a Lion passant guardant on the sinister Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure a Morfex Argent beaked Sable holding in its beak an Eel proper; Mantled Gules doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side an Otter and on the sinister side a Beaver the latter langued Gules.

Motto 'DEO FRETUS ERUMPE' - Trust God, and sally.
Granted 8th December 1561 to the former Borough of Newark-on-Trent. (Although the tinctures of the supporters are not specified they are painted proper).

newark tc arms

The wavy bars, crest, and supporters refer to Newark's riverside position. The fleur-de-lis and lion are royal emblems. Local opinion takes the bird as the symbol of pride.
Several variations of the crest have been quoted. The bird has been described as a morfex, a seagull, and a martlet; and the eel has been called a snake. In the above description I have followed the original blazon - "Barre wave of Six peces silver and azure a chefe goules therein a peakocke displayed proper colour betwene a flowre de luce and a lyon passant regardant, golde on the helmet on a wreath silver and azure a morfex silver, beaked sable, therein holding a Ele in proper collor mant­led gules doubled silver bottoned golde, the said Armes assisted betweene two supporters A Otter and a Beaver both in proper coller The beaver langued gules."
The motto was added in 1912 and is a translation of the valiant words of the Mayor, to Lord Bellasyse, during the siege of Newark by the Parliamentarians in 1646.


RIPLEY TOWN COUNCIL (DERBYSHIRE)

ARMS: Vert on a Chevron Or between in chief two Stags' Heads caboshed and in base a Fleur de Lys Argent a Chevronel Sable surmounted by a Tudor Rose barbed and seeded proper all within a Bordure also Argent thereon six Horseshoes also Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours out of a Mural Crown Sable Flames proper issuant therefrom a Unicorn's Head Argent armed and crined Or charged with three Spearheads erect one and two Gules.

Motto 'INGENIUM INDUSTRIA ALITUR' - Skill is fostered by diligence.
Granted 8th April 1954, to the Ripley Urban District Council.

ripley tc arms

The green background of the shield refers to the Royal Forest of Duffield which gives the ancient background of the district. The stags' heads, another reference to the Forest, are also from the arms of the Cavendish Dukes of Devonshire who came into possession of Ripley after the Dissolution. The chevron is for Heage or "Highedge" and also for the hilly character of the situation of Ripley. The black thinner chevron represents the coal seam lying beneath, and the Tudor rose, from the County arms, also refers to Coronation year, in which the grant of arms was sought. The fleur de lys is from a seal attributed to Darley Abbey, and is also the emblem of St. Mary patron of Crich, part of which is in the District. As the whole area was formerly in the protection of Darley Abbey, the arms are surrounded by a white border with six black horseshoes from the arms of its founders, the Ferrers family.
The black mural crown denotes a mining town, and the unicorn's head, adapted from the Wright crest which is used by the Butterley Company, rises from the flames suggesting the local heavy industries.
The motto can also be translated as "Character thrives on hard work" or "Ability thrives on industry" and is a quotation from Cicero.


SLEAFORD TOWN COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Gules on a Chevron Or three Estoiles Sable on a Chief Argent as many Trefoils slipped Vert.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours an Eagle wings extended and head downwards and to the sinister proper holding in the beak an Ear of Wheat stalked and leaved Or.

Granted 26th October 1950, to the Sleaford Urban District Council.

sleaford tc arms

The lower portion of the shield is the arms of the Carre family, closely associated with the town in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and founded of the local almshouses and grammar school. The three trefoils are from the arms of the Herveys, Marquesses of Bristol and Lords of the Manor.
The eagle refers to the town's links with the R.A.F., especially through the R.A.F. College at Cranwell. The ear of wheat refers to agriculture.


STAMFORD TOWN COUNCIL (LINCOLNSHIRE)

ARMS: Per pale dexter side Gules three Lions passant guardant in pale Or and the sinister side chequy Or and Azure.

Recorded at the Visitation of 1634 for the former Borough of Stamford.

stamford tc arms

The blue and gold chequers are those of the Earls Warenne, who held the Manor in the 13th century. The three gold lions on red, like the English Royal arms, were probably used as a token that Stamford was a royal borough.


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